EXPERTS PLEASE HELP - Ground Rods & Grounding & Multiple Meters

Correct me if I am wrong and then please help!
Incoming power is usually 3 wires: 2 - 110 phases and neutral which go to the breaker box. Then a ground rod is installed near the breaker box (which is usually located at the entry to the house) and tied to neutral there. Then the 110 phases, neutral, & ground are distributed through out the house to the outlets (three independent wires to each outlet chain).
My configuration (in Nicaragua, land of the uneducated): Three incoming #0 lines from a common 3 wire power pole line. Each incoming line 3 wires: 2 - 110 phases and neutral. I see no ground wire connected to the neutral at the power pole. I have 8 meters. One incoming line goes to 1 meter, the Second line to 4 meters and the Third line to 3 meters.
Then the 3 wire outputs of the 8 meters (2 - 110 phases and neutral) go to 8 breaker boxes located in different rooms (they say this is the code there to have the breaker boxes in the rooms).
BUT, there is NO ground wire in the box to go to the third green terminal on the outlets. Can I install 8 ground rods at each breaker box to provide a green ground wire? Should I connect this to neutral at each of the breaker boxes?
I think maybe the real question is: Is there a problem if I use multiple ground stakes? Should they be connected to neutral at each of the 8 boxes as well as to the green terminal going to the outlets?
Or should I install 1 ground stake and connect to ALL boxes and all circuits?
THANK YOU!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The US rule is you can connect the ground electrode conductor anywhere from the service point where the customer owns the wire to the service disconnect. Usually it happens in the meter base or the service disconnect enclosure. You really only need one ground electrode system per service drop but that is usually 2 rods at least 2 meters apart and bonded together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My guess is that somewhere on the pole, where the transformer is, there will be a ground connection for the utility company. Typically in the US, you would just have one large line feeding the building, not several small lines, and you would install your ground rod or rods and grounding conductor at the "main" disconnect(s). This grounding conductor would also be bonded to the neutral at this location. It would make sense to me that you install one set of rods with a grounding conductor bonded to each main in the building, but I'd check with whatever authority is in charge there.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Is there a problem if I use multiple ground stakes?" I have two ground stakes buried on my system. Can't recall exactly how they are connected. MLD

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No problem at all, sometimes it's required

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. And for simple connection, just take the heavy wire you are using to bond the items together, and run the wire from one to the next, then to the box. Then you only have one wire to connect to the boxes.

Again, if you can run the bonding wire through the terminals, so you don't have to cut it, then run to the grounding stake.
What is desired is that each has a straight shot with a single path to the ground. No ground wires in parallel.
-- Silly sig to prevent isp ad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.