exhaust fan timer

I would like to replace a bathroom exhaust fan switch with one that has a timer. The current switch is on a 15 amp circuit. I found a 20 amp timer switch which I would like to use instead. Is this OK?
I assume that the switch itself would draw very little current to operate the timer.
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Harvey Louzon wrote:

If the rating of the switch is greater than the rating of the circuit then you are good to go!
If you have a 15 amp circuit then you have a 15 amp breaker which means if the circuit draws more than 15 amps it will be disabled due to tripped breaker. A 20 amp switch means it that switch can handle 20 amps. In your case the switch would never be able to see 20 amps because the breaker would trip first!
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Harvey Louzon wrote:

Definitely it is OK. All it means is that the switch can handle more than the circuit breaker. The CB will protect it.
As a point of interest, I have done this exact thing in both of my bathrooms. Before, I used to walk out and maybe not notice I left the fan on for a couple of days if I used the bathroom I only occasionally use. No more.
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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I have used the Intermatic Spring Wound Timers. They are easy to find at Lowes/HD, very reliable (never repalced one yet). Need no white wire as they don't use electricity and can fit all standard switch configurations. They fit regular and Decora faceplates. Usually under $10. Harvey Louzon wrote:

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I use the Intermatic Timer in our bathroom for the exhaust fan. They had two models to pick from at Home Depot; 60 minutes or a 24 hour timer. The 60 minute model makes the most sense for me. Runs the exhaust fan for 60 minutes after we use the shower. Just be advised that there is no way to shut it off once you start it. It HAS to run it's course, you can't turn it backwards to OFF after you start it.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

You make it sound like you *have* to set it to 60 minutes. You don't. Mine allows anywhere from 10 minutes to 60 minutes but like you say, once it's set there's no turning it off early. OTOH, why would you want to?
I generally leave mine on for 30 minutes during and after a shower; maybe 15 minutes after any other business in the can.
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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On Sat, 20 May 2006 09:09:49 GMT, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN"

If you wanted to be able to turn it off, you could put a regular switch in series.

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