excessive telephone noise - need help

My wife and I have two lines in our house. Line 1 is the "home" line, and Line 2 is her "office" line. Our DSL service also comes in with Line 2. Line 1 has 3 phones coming off two jacks. One jack is in the office, and is connected to a phone with wirless handset. The other jack is in the bedroom with a splitter. One line goes to a phone/answering machine in the bedroom, while the other goes through the wall to a regular wall phone in the kitchen. Line 2 is split off the same jack as Line 1 in the office. It is further split by a phone company (also our ISP) device into the DSL and Line 2. The DSL line goes to their modem, then to a router for a home network with 2 hard wired desktops, a wireless desktop, and a wireless laptop. Line 2 goes to a Panasonic combined phone/fax, and through that to a standalone answering machine.
Line 2 appears to have no problem. There is no noise on my wife's business phone, fax works without problem, the DSL operates normally with good speed and no dropped connection.
Line 1 has constant noise, resembling AM radio static, very crackly. It ebbs and flows, sometimes being low, sometimes being so loud as to drown out conversation. My nephew heard it on his end and was convinced it was DSL noise, suggesting I get filters. I bought two filters and put them on both Line 1 jacks, with no noticeable improvement.
I have unplugged all phones and checked each, one at a time. Noise always present. I have checked Line 1 and Line 2 jacks at the box outside the house. No noise on Line 1, so the problem is inside the house.
Note: The noise began when the phone company/ISP upgraded a couple months ago. The DSL used to have a dedicated jack inside, but they rerouted into the configuration above. Their techs were actually in the house. Unfortunately, I was not. But because the line has no noise at the box, they do not consider it to be their issue.
I would appreciate any help anyone can offer. Thanks.
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Sound like you are using regular, stranded wire and one little thread has come loose and it touching another line. Start at the 2-line splitter and remove the cover and look at the screws holding the wires in place. Look for small wires (strands) that are loose and out of place. Move it back to where it belongs. Check all of your boxes and you'll probably find a little tiny wire out of place.
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All wire throughout is solid.
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Sounds like to me that you just have a bad cord somewhere. It could be the line coming from the outside box to the inside and might be as simple as an installer having misfired and put a staple in it.
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But in this case, nothing was stapled, no wires were run. When the DSL was first installed a couple years back, the tech mounted a dedicated box with jack in the office. When they came back this time, due to some sort of equipment upgrade, they abandoned that box and went to the original box and jack, so they just unplugged the line from one and plugged into the other a few inches away.
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In article

Sign-up for their Inside Wire Maintenance service then, a few days later, make a trouble report. They should isolate the cause and probably fix it at no additional charge.
Given your description; Two lines, one with DSL, and splitters and other devices all over creation, only an experienced professional would have much luck promptly and efficiently isolating, and hopefully even fixing, the problem. Good luck.
--
:)
JR

Climb poles and dig holes
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Can you disconnect line 2 where it enters your house? Also unplug modem from line 2. If noise is still present, I would assume a poor connection for line one probably near where it enters your house and various phone wires fork off it. Maybe one of the devices on the line is noisy, disconnect one at a time.
I am not sure if it is DSL noise (actually high frequency that DSL uses), it should not make it through a DSL line filter. After all the filters work fine on line two.
Finally a quote from Intro. to Sci Research:
"Often one's faith in cause and effect is put to a severe test by apparatus troubles, and the weak are likely to fall back on their ancestral inheritance of faith in gremlins and psychic phenomena. The persistent and materially minded scientist will, however, generally find the trouble by logical methods."

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At every modular connection unplug and inspect male and female ends for corrosion. At every screw connection loosen, clean and retighten. Corrosion problems make for noisy lines that intermittantly get better and worse with rain and humidity changes. Alternately if you have an unused pair of wires in the cable try switching over. For example if you are on red and green try using black and yellow to eliminate the wires themselves as a cause.
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On Tue, 4 Dec 2007 08:27:32 -0800 (PST), beecrofter

I had the same problem on two occasions over the years. Both times I traced it to corrosion to one of the modular jacks in my basement. Visual inspection in situ was inconclusive. Finally ran it down by physically disconnecting one jack at a time until the culprit was identified. It wasn't until the jack was on the workbench under bright light that the tiny bit of greenish corrosion became apparent. HTH
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The "crackly" is indicative. Would you say it sounds like a frying pan with hot oil in it? Popping sounds?

That's indicative too. Something changes. (DSL's don't change...)

Doesn't sound like DSL, as that would be fairly constant, with no variation.
The popping, frying pan, sound is typical of a stray ground on one side of the pair of wires. The ebb and flow might perhaps be related the humidity? More noise when it is damp, less when it is dry?
If so you've got got some water or whatever that is causing leakage to ground. Typically this might be at a wall jack or a junction box; any place where the wires are bare and something nearby is grounded.
It could also be a place where a cable has been pulled through a wall or whatever, and the insulation was damaged in the process, and now for whatever reason that has gotten wet.
Hmmm... sometimes such noise will change after an incoming call rings the line. The high voltage ring current breaks down the corrosion and burns it off, so the noise is lower for a day or so. Then it returns.

Yep, inside, and your problem.

Hmmm... look that DSL over really well. For example, if these two lines are at any point run as two pairs in a single 4 wire cable, there is a good chance that at some point they all four get plugged into a jack on the DSL. That's probably bad.
What happens if you disconnect the cables to the DSL? Does that change the noise on the other line?
You're just going to have to trace that line through everthing, disconnecting and inspecting as you go, until you find it. But things like disconnected one leg to over there, and then the other leg to over here, and so on can help isolate what is good and what is bad.
--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) snipped-for-privacy@apaflo.com
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