Epoxy Fix Question

Page 2 of 2  
On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 08:49:54 -0600, Vic Smith wrote:

Yes, doesn't fit in the space available.

I have an old one from another sink, it is lead.

And probably blow up the porcelain.

Been there, done that.

See above.

Moto will cost as much as a new sink.

Nope.
Cheaper to buy new, but we have a bunch that need work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 14:50:23 -0600, Michael Dobony

I needed a grinding tool recently. I got one from Harbor Freight. I think it was $12. Didn't have an extension, but I think they had that too. Is it as good as a Dremel? Probably not by a long shot. But I managed to get through 61 years without such a tool, so I figured there's a good chance I'll never use it again. It got the job done (grinding away half a dozen screws whose hex heads had rusted beyond getting a wrench or even a vice grip on). If I'm real lucky, it'll sit on my shelf for the next 40 years. More likely the next time it sees the light of day will be as part of my estate sale.
Edward
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

[ Harbor Freight }

And after those 40 years there will be ooo's & ahhhhhh's with "My goodnes, they just don't make 'em like that any more. Look! It's all plastic and metal vs recycled leaves."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Remind me to not attend your sale ;-)
In that category, mine will have the 30,000 RPM CRAFTSMAN/RotoZip and plunge router/circle cutter kit,AND the CRAFTSMAN 30,000 1/4" "Rotary Die Grinder" AND the standard 1/8" DREMEL rotary tool with the 80 accessory kit. (Maybe I have too many tools ;-))
Some days I have a hard time deciding which one to use to cut off bolt heads..
--- ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2010 12:09:11 -0500, Edward Reid wrote:

Actually I now seem to recall that someone may have bought one for a construction project in the north building, will ask around.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I understand your problem. Epxoy will be a temporary solution. If you can get some of it down between the bottom of utthe sink and the nut that night help. But since you can't loosen or tighten the nuts the chances of you getting much penetration between the faucet and the sink are low. Epoxy gobbed on the outside will be very temporary. The leverage and poor gluing surface are working against you.
There are tools for attempting to get the nut off. As others have mentioned a dremel would also work. You might go around every day for a few weeks and spray the nut area with wd40 or whatever your favorite spray is.
Those old porcelain cast iron sinks are pretty tough, I'd' even try a small chisel on your nut if nothing else worked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/18/2010 7:19 AM jamesgangnc spake thus:

Meaning a small COLD chisel, not a wood chisel.
But I agree: there's always a way to get things like this off. May take a lot of patience and a coordinated attack plan, but you can somehow un-freeze, crack, split, cut or chisel the nut off.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

actually, if they are in fact lead, a sharp edge, or even a pencil soldering iron, would cut through it pretty easily.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You can be almost dead certain the nut holding the tap shank to the sink is NOT lead.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 20:42:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It is NOT zinc, but lead, or more precisely, a lead alloy (another one pulled through the hole when the giant washer disintegrated). I ended up getting a multitool, not for this job, but for an ongoing job of replacing broken windows. The multitool is the only reasonable way to pull out the old, hard caulking between the aluminum retainer and the glass in these old 1950's commercial windows. Replacing these windows is an time-consuming and ongoing job. I have 3 critical windows right now to work on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.