"Entry Level" what does that mean? HVAC question...

My last house was 2200 sq foot. It has wall-2-wall carpet, ceramic tile in the entry way, linoleum in the kitchen, Formica counters. It was a nice home and I sold it for $140K ( SE USA.) The realtor described it as an Entry Level home. What does that mean? A Cheap house?
I'm in a new home now, a bit nicer then the one I was in, and bigger to boot. However it also has Formica and linoleum in the kitchen. When I get ready to sell it, I don't want it to be an Entry Level Home. What changes can I make so it is no longer entry level? I'd like to do something that I can get use out of now, rather then 5 or 10 years down the road when I decide to sell it. Suggestions?
Also, the house had Gas heat and a gas water heater. My summer electric bill was $350 for a 2 story brick house ( 4 bedrooms, 2 & 1/2 bath great room) I don't know the sq foot but it would have to be closer to 3k then 2500. The bill seems a bit high and I was thinking of getting a new HVAC unit. The Electric company gave me a flyer showing that a heat pump was cheaper to use then gas heat. I've had a heat pump before and I think it give poor heat v/s gas heat. But I was thinking replacing the HVAC with something ultra efficient or even using geothermal heat pump (if I went that route.)
Comments on both, thoughts, flames? S
Steve
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Typically it means that it's priced on the low end in a particular market. There's nothing inherently "wrong" with your realtor advertising it as such. In fact, in many areas, the so-called 'entry-level" houses are being sold much quicker and have the largest percent appreciation each year.
Interior finish item upgrades (granite countertops, hardwood floors, 6-panel solid doors, etc) may or may not make your house not be considered "entry levels". About a decade ago I looked at a good number of houses that had some of these ammenities, but they were still very much "entry level" to me due to their market price and square footage. So the lesson is-- it's unlikely that you'll be able to make your house a level or more about "entry level" if that's what all the neighbor's houses are, generally speaking...
-Tim
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Cheap as in low quality - no. Cheap relative to the avg cost of homes purchased where you are - yes possibly.
2200 sq ft for 140k can be an unoccupyable wreck in an area where a 1200 sf starter/entry level home is 400-700k. It can be a nice brand new palce in other areas.

Nicer is always good.

This seems to be is important to you? Bigger is good if you were crunched for space before. If you weren't crunched and you still think bigger is better then you are more concerned about what other people think of where you live vs what you think about where you live.

Then don't buy an entry level home. What do you care what they label it? You are more concerned with that than the selling price. What you should be focusing on for selling is what can you do to get the most bang for the buck and make it move fast. In general, a house will only bring what other homes sold for in the past 6 mos. in the surrounding area...aka the Comps with adjustments for features. The biggest adjustment - sq footage.

Nothing. You can make it a nice entry level. You can make it a great entry level. You can make it a surperb entry level.

Finally thinking of yourself!

"Had" gas heat? What the old 2200 sf one? Or do you mean the new one had gas heat? If so, what happened to it? Where did it go?! And you bought a new house and don't know how many sq ft it is? But you said the last place was 2200 and the current one is closer to 3k. I'm really getting lost here.
A bit high? Compared to what the last house? Well when you say it's bigger to boot and closer to 3k sf (+800 sf), what do you expect? 800 sf is another 35%. Yes there are many efficency factors involves but it's still a 35% increase. Toss in vaulted ceilings and there's a chunk.

Yes they do. We both know that obviously. With gas you get real heat from a flame. You pay for that but you get it.

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On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 20:11:44 -0400, Stevey Sandlin

Might be easier to share thoughts if we knew some additional information.
How much per kwh do you pay?
How much insulation in attic?
What is the condition of the house? Well, bad, etc....
later,
tom @ www.Consolidated-Loans.info
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Did you say you lived in Alaska?
On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 20:11:44 -0400, Stevey Sandlin

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On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 20:11:44 -0400, Stevey Sandlin

An entry level home often refers to a home that a young couple buys when they have little money. For example, your home may have sold for 140K when the typical price of home in the area are 200K. Actually, it is a big plus to buy a home where the surrounding homes are valued higher. You may be able to add improvements to increase the overall value, but these improvements must be selected carefully.
For energy costs think about caulking, insulation, thermo pane windows, shade trees on the south side, etc. Personally I do not like electric heat--gas heat is less expensive, at least in my region.
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