Enlarging a hole for a deadbolt

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That would work with the el-cheapo stack holesaw sets, but ain't gonna make it with my Lennox set.
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Ryder) writes:
| > [snip] | > | > I found the article, just a snippet, really - "The Family Handyman" | > October | > 2004. pp 19. It syas to use two hole saws, the pilot saw the same | > diameter | > os the existing hole and the larger hole saw (the correct size) - install | > both. Go slowly until the pilot saw aligns the larger. | > | > Looks soooo easy, | > | > Josie | > | > | > | > | | That would work with the el-cheapo stack holesaw sets, but ain't gonna make | it with my Lennox set.
The Starrett Oops arbor will fit your Lennox saws (as well as Milwaukee and Blu-Mol). It seems very handy in concept, though I admit that I have not opened it since I bought it...
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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have a

The
Kwikset, but

requires
the
saber
more
Really makes you want to slap the bejeezus out of whomever designed lock packaging containing the words "Easy Installation!" :-) Nothing in home repair is as quick as we wish it would be.
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Kanter) writes:
| OK, wizards - here's a situation I can't find a good solution to. I have a | Yale deadbolt in my back door, and want to replace with a KwikSet. The | backset (from edge of door to center of hole) is correct for Kwikset, but | the hole's size is too small. It's about 1-3/4", and the Kwikset requires | 2-1/8". I've got the right size hole saw, but without solid wood for the | guide bit, I can't see a way for the saw to work correctly. Using a saber | saw is a possibility, I guess, but I wonder if there's something more | elegant, as opposed to turning this into a cob job. | | Anyone got a cool trick?
Starrett has a special "Oops" arbor (seriously, that's the name) that lets you use one hole saw as a pilot for a bigger hole saw. It has a 1/4" shank and threads for both saw sizes. I think you might be better off just clamping a piece of wood over the hole as others have suggested, though. When my locksmith did this he used his normal lock jig. Versions of that are available at home stores.
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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Cut a plug to fill the hole, glue it in place, then redrill. You'll even have a pilot hole.
djb
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I buy rubber arbors for sanding drums. Press in a piece of tubing to act as a pilot bearing.
Bill
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Once again, the solution to this was illustrated in the latest edition of "The Family Handyman".
Mount two hole saws on the same arbor. Slide the larger one on first so it will be closer to the drill chuck, then slide the 1 3/4" saw on. Tighten both, insert the smaller one in the existing hole, using it as a pilot.

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Kwikset makes a drill jig for just this. I bought one about 15 years ago for my locksmith biz. And have made a pile of money with it. Call a local locksmith and pay him a lot of money.
Plan B is to take two pieces of thin plywood, and a couple C-clamps. Clamp plywood on both sides of the door. Use a carpenters square to mark where the hole oughta be, and drill with a hole saw. I personally can't encourage you to do this, cause it would deprive a brother locksmith of a house call.
--

Christopher A. Young
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"A brother locksmith"? Give me a break!

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I've had the same problem replacing Dexter Locks with Baldwins. Our local Ace Hardware Store has a kit that they rent out. It contains a large metal jig that clamps to the door and a 2 1/8 inch forsner bit. Easy, fool proof and fast. Takes about 4 minutes. They rent it out for about $20 for a couple of hours and require a $200 deposit to make sure you use it and bring it back.

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Use your 2 1/8" holesaw to drill a hole through a short piece of a 2X6 or similar, then clamp that on the door so the drilled hole lines up with where you need the new hole in the door. The (dare I say it) predrilled 2 1/8" hole will act as a guide for the holesaw.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Using a saber

My hole saw setup lets a person attach two hole saws to one mandrel. In effect there's one hole saw inside a bigger one. Could you do something like that ~ put a hole saw for the existing sized hole inside the bigger one you actually want?
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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 02:19:32 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Tack a 1/4" piece of plywood across the hole, use a hole saw to drill the new hole. Plywood acts as a guide, pull the tacks and a few tiny holes to putty and repaint.
Jeff
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wrote:

Just *jam* a piece of wood in the hole. Drill your new hole.
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1) Remove door from hinges and lay it horizontally on the table of your drill press. Support the outer portions of the door with a platform made of 2 x 4s and plywood (or OSB) left over from previous projects. 2) Adjust the height of this platform to match the height of your drill press table so the door is level. 3) Apply wide duct tape (or masking tape left over from a previous painting project) to the underside of the door hole, making sure to seal the tape around the hole in preparation for the next step. 4) Create a mixture of "Bondo" and wood chips recovered from your shop dust collection system. If you have recently cleaned out the dust collection system and don't have enough chips you may substitute 1/2 lb. of toothpicks run through your office shredder. (Many folks don't realize this little "trick of the trade"). 5) When it is about the consistency of toothpaste (Crest), pour it into the old hole, making sure to completely fill the opening. 6) When this 'plug" has set up, drill your damn hole!
;-)
wrote:

a
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You keep your used masking tape from previous projects? Seems strange that you're into saving stuff like that, but then want to waste some bondo and a 1/2 lb. of toothpicks to fill a hole that you're about to remove.
The best solution I read in the original thread was to cut the new size hole in a scrap of plywood. Clamp this over the old hole, and use it for a guide. Cut halfway through, then flip the door over and repeat from the other side. You can ensure correct placement for the back cut by placing alignment marks on some masking tape (new or old) on the door edge and on the plywood, then matching them up on the other side.
Waiting for Bondo to set? You're obviously charging by the hour. It certainly would work reliably though...
-Mike
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A (very young) guy at Home Depot suggested that I just try and hold the larger hole saw really steady, and that hopefully, once it bit in 1/4" or so, the wood would guide it. Obviously, his dad never taught him the meaning of "cob job". :-)
I really appreciate all the GOOD suggestions here, by the way. Now, I'm waiting for the hardware store guy to key the new locks alike, and I'll select the most exciting idea from the list!
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Me! Me! Pick Me!

meaning
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Worst idea so far - my son's. He suggested I try enlarging the hole with a curved rasp. I told him "knock yourself out - just set aside the entire morning". He changed his mind. He emphasized that ***I*** was to do the work.

or
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On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:09:57 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Okay, I've done this. When you're on site with no hole saw and you need to improvise, this one works reasonably well.
Jeff

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