Electrical: working with 1/0 SER cable


Hello,
I need to some work with 1/0 Al SER cable but haven't dealt with anything so large before. I assume careful use of a utility knife will be adequate for removing the exterior sheathing. For cutting conductors I usually use Klein Tools 1412, but it says "Cut Copper Only" and seems a little small. What is recommended? And how about stripping the 1/0?
Thanks, Wayne
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

I've not worked with cable quite that big, but you can use a hacksaw with a very fine-toothed blade to cut large conductors. That Klein tool will work just fine on soft aluminum, but it's not big enough for this. (they don't want you cutting steel wire, or aluminum wire with a steel messenger wire in it)
Just carefully strip the wires with the utility knife, being careful not to nick the strands. Practice on a scrap before you attack the real cable ends.
Bob
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Thanks for the guidance. How about a reciprocating saw with a very fine-toothed blade, would that work?
Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

Sure, but a hacksaw will be easier. If you want to use a power tool, maybe a 4" angle grinder with a metal cutoff wheel.
Bob
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Great, I have one of those handy for cutting metal straps and threaded rod. Thanks for the suggestions.
Cheers, Wayne
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I cut 2/0 Copper with hacksaw and striped with utility knife. There's no reason that the same won't work for AL cable.
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 16:21:27 GMT, Wayne Whitney

I doubt you would hurt the K1412 on aluminum but it is too small. The Copper Only reference is mostly so you don't try to cut nails and screws with it.
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 16:21:27 GMT, Wayne Whitney

If you mean Triplex, you DO NOT want to cut the rigid steel (center conductor) on the bare conductor with any sort of wire cutter. I destroyed an expensive wire cutter the first time I tried to cut that stuff. Hacksaw blades dont hold up either. The teeth are gone in seconds. A bolt cutter is said to work, but it took a chunk out of the cutting edge on mine too. Although it was not a top of the line quality tool. So far, grinding it with an angle grinder or any other grinder seems to be the only way to do it without wrecking tools or fighting with it. I dont know what kind of steel they use on those center conductors, but its extremely hard, and must be some sort of stainless stell too, because they dont rust or corrode, especially since they are encased in aluminum wire.
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snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com wrote:

Triplex is two insulated conductors wrapped around a bare neutral conductor. The bare neutral conductor is Aluminum Clad Steel reinforced wire so that it can serve as the messenger to support the other two.
Type SE. Service-entrance cable having a flame-retardant, moisture-resistant covering. SE R is only Type SE which is cabled to have a round cross section. It is extremely rare to find individual type SE conductors assembled as Triplex.
To cut these larger cable assemblies most electricians will use a Utility Cable Cutter, such as a Klein 63035, or a Ratcheting Cable Cutter such, as a Klein 63060 both are short enough to carry in a tool bag and yet provide enough leverage to still do the job. Type USE and SE can be readily cut with a hack saw.
Stripping the conductors can be done with a utility knife but it is easier and safer to use a Curved sheepfoot slitting blade such as the Klein 1550-24 Electricians Knife.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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