Electrical Outlet and Kitchen sink

What is the rule for GFI's and kichen sinks. I read on one web sit you need one if you are w/in 6 feed of the tap. But the reality is that in the dozens of houses I have been in the kitchen never has a GFI,s in them. and I have seen outlets 2-3 feet from tap. I will most likely put in a GFI but Im just wondering why no one seems to have them in their professionally build and wired kitchens. (and they are not at the fuse box). And by the way Is there distance that the out let must be from water?
Regards
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the electrical codes evolve for your safety depending on the date of construction. see: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 /
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I always thought the electric code evolved to keep stupid people from killing someone.

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steve wrote:

If the houses were older, then the electical setup probably doesn't meet current code. If the houses are newer, the GFI protection may be run off a single GFI to other receptacles, or a GFI breaker in the panel can do the job.
R
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Thanks all for your comments.
Regards Steve
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Current NEC requirements are that every countertop space of 12 inches or greater must have a GFCI protected outlet above it and no wall space above the countertop can be more than two feet from a GFCI protected outlet. It also requires a minimum of two 20 amp circuits for these outlets

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RBM ( snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net) said...

Just for reference, the CEC has a few differences...
All counter space cannot be more than 3' from an outlet behind it.
Outlets may be either 5-15R split on a 15A double-pole breaker (3000 watts), or 5-20RA on a 20A single-pole breaker (2000 watts)
Outlets within 3' of a sink must be GFCI protected. Since split GFCI outlets do not exist, either a standard outlet that is split fed from a 15A GFCI double-pole breaker (expensive option) or a 5-20RA GFCI outlet on a 20A single-pole breaker may be used.
Not more than two counter outlets may be on one branch circuit.
Notwithstanding the last rule, outlets installed on the front of lower cabinets for access by disabled persons may be on the same circuit as the nearest outlet behind the counter (it is seen as an "extension" of that outlet, not an additional outlet).
Outlets on the same branch circuit may not be adjacent to each other along the counter top.
Other kitchen outlets requirements: there must be one outlet near a table/seating area on its own 15A circuit (non-split). Refrigerators must be on their own circuit (though, a clock outlet may be placed on this circuit).
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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Thanks certainly you have given a very detailed list. It appears as other have said that the rules have changed over the years, thus everyone's kitchen is different. Certainly in the past they didn t seem to worry about GFI's in kitchens. They now seem to have changed their minds on this. Like for example the new rules for bedrooms, that they are suppose to have the anti arcing fuses. Perhaps as houses get more expensive it really doesnt add that much more to the cost.
An interesting thing I read on a Canadian Hydro web site. Is that you are not suppose to wire up under the counter lights to outlets on the wall behind the counter. This is a common thing that homeowners add but is not actually not proper according the the code.
Based on the info I have gathered from the advice on this newsgroup, some outlets I will GFI from the fuse box others I will just put GFI outlets in.
Thanks again all.
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Many kitchen appliances have metal covers. A metal kitchen sink will be grounded. If you touch a malfunctioning appliance with one hand and the metal sink with the other at the same time, ZAP! Or kid sticks knife in toaster while he has one hand on sink - ZAP
A GFI will quickly turn off power before any harm can be done.
These codes are there to protect *you*, your family, and someone who may buy your house at some later time. And the codes are there because of something which has happened to someone in the past.
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Bill, I don't disagree with your advice, but I think you need to modify your thoughts on kitchen sinks. I would suggest that the majority of them are not grounded. PVC waste lines and PEX supply lines have just about done away with the sink being grounded.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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DanG wrote:

Maybe not directly grounded through a metallic path, but what say you about the water in those supply lines and the faucets being in electrical contact with the sink? That water probably contacts ground somewhere upstream in the plumbing, 'eh?
The conductivity of typical city water likely wouldn't be low enough to avoid 120 volts pushing a nasty current through it and someone's chest. I wouldn't volunteer to test out the thesis.
Jeff
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Steve, honestly it really depends on where you are located and what your electrical authority will require.
I strongly urge you to contact your authority directly to ask any of these questions, and review if any electrical permits are required.
Skimming through the CSA Canadian Electrical Code 2002; I can only find reference to GFI plugs required in restrooms:
Receptacles: 26-700 (11) Receptacles located in bathrooms or washrooms and installed within 3 m of washbasins, bathtubs, or shower stalls shall be protected by a ground fault circuit interrupter of the Class A type.
However, within the CSA simplified guide (see below for full title of publication) I see the following:
"Another important consideration is whether or not the receptacle needs to be protected by a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI). The code requires that any receptacle within 3 m (10 ft.) of a sink, bathtub, or shower stall be protected by a Class A GFCI, and in some parts of Canada, ground fault protection is also required for any receptacle located on a kitchen counter work surface that contans a sink (check with local inspection authorities). ..."
Here are some other excerpts according to the 2002 CSA Canadian Electrical Code:
Receptacles in Residential Occupancies 26-710 c) Receptacles shall not be mounted facing up in the work surfaces or counters in the kitchen or dining area and d) Where split receptacles are installed on a side of a counter work surface in a kitchen designed for use by persons with disabilities, such receptacles shall not be considered as substituting for the receptacles required by Rule 26-712(d)
If you reside in Canada you may want to obtain a copy of CSA's "Do it right - Wiring for Canadian homes and cottages - a guide to the CSA Canadian Electrical Code." This guide simplifies information for Canadian residential electrical installation requirements.
Hope this is of some assistance,
Justin
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