Electric furnace?

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in an area of the country that drops below 60 deg F. or so.
Small generators such as a common 5 KW will not do much to power electric heat or a heat pump. They will run the blowers for a gas type of heat.
I have a heatpump and a wood stove in the basement that I seldom use except if the power goes off. My generator will not power the heat pump, but will power the well pump and if I cut off most everything else, the water heater. Heat the water, cut off the water heater and take a quick shower.
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On Wednesday, October 14, 2015 at 10:26:35 AM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

60 F? Good grief! It was 60 F and windy yesterday, yet my house was 73 F due to the waste heat from the fridge and television. I had to open the windows to cool the house down.
Cindy Hamilton
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More likely the whole house had stored a fair amount of heat and was "heat-soaked" (learned that from my NASA geek friends - they routinely "cold-soak" potential spacecraft to chill them down completely to temperature levels that they would encounter. Lots and lots of very common and frequently used construction and electronic items just go to pieces at very low temps.
If the house is closed up and it's sunny, there's a solar boost. Even humidity gets stored up and the indoor humidity always lags the outdoor one, at least around here, by several days. Wood, cloth, carpets and lots of other material absorbs moisture.
The best example I can give for homes being "cold-soaked" is how long it takes for the bed and lots of other items to come up to room temperature. The air is warm, but the house and its contents are not. I had a furnace fail when I was away once and the house was close to freezing. The warmest part of the house, ironically, was the basement where most of the copper piping was. I had to get the electric blanket out because the bed kept sucking the heat out of me.
--
Bobby G.



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I just picked a temperature that suited me. With no electricity , there will be no TV and fridge to make heat. Not sure how long it would take to get a house from 70 or so down to 60 with out anthing to make heat.
While 60 deg is fine for some, I don't like to be cold and I am cold natured. We keep the house at 72 in the winter and 74 in the summer.
Due to allageries the windows stay closed here. I have lived in this house for 10 years and one window was opened once by a man to put a new rug in the bedroom. He wanted to go in the window with the rug as he said it would be easier for him to do that.
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On Wednesday, October 14, 2015 at 7:15:16 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Like someone else pointed out, it's actually the sun that's warming the house, not the TV and fridge. Fridge today is under 100W, TV, IDK, maybe 150W for a big one? Really insignificant heat for a home.
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On Wed, 14 Oct 2015 17:33:39 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Look at all the heat coming out of a modern computer. Some of these new multicore computers have 4 or 5 fans in them because of the excessive heat they produce. The older computers from the early 2000's and prior were low powered, but not anymore. If you can live with an older computer, running Windows XP or an earlier operating system, you can save a lot of power. But these newer operating systems cant run on that older hardware.
I had a friend call me because her computer would turn itself off after 10 minutes or less. It was a multicore Dell machine. The CPU fan and Power supply fan both worked, but the larger fan on the back of the case had died. It was darn near hot enough at that CPU heatsink to fry an egg. Because a replacement fan had to be ordered, I rigged up a window fan and some cardboard to divert the air thru the computer, and told her to make sure that fan is running if she needed to use the computer, and to turn off the computer as soon as she is finished. It worked fine until the replacement fan arrived in the mail a week later.
I never leave on my newer computer in hot weather, but I dont worry much about using my old early 2000's single core machine with XP.
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I need to move up to a new computer, but was not aware of the heat probs you mention. My ancient P4 box doesn't even leave the PS fan running during use, only during boot up. I thought the newer CPUs were similar, but you say multi cores need mucho cooking. Zat include i5's and i7's?
Thnx. I'll keep this info in mind.
nb
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heat department - I have i3, i5, and i7 machines and they all stay nice and cool without the fans running on high.
Those AMD monsters can be a horse of a totally different color. A few years ago a customer burned out 3 motherboards - actually BURNED through the circuit boards. Finally convinced him to go Intel instead of AMD, even though for a "gamer machine" the AMDs were significantly faster.
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<stuff snipped>

Back in the day when I was building 400mHz clones, the AMD chips would self-immolate if they lost cooling - i.e. if you booted up without remembering to reattach the fan.
Intel CPUs of the same vintage merely throttled back the operating speed when the cooling failed. AMD said it was the motherboard maker's responsibility to cover "cooling failures" but I found that very unsatifisying. Those huge coolers of the era could pop off if the machine was moved roughly and more than one CPU was killed on bootup because of it. I stopped using AMD based motherboards until they finally relenting and began building CPUs that didn't incinerate themselves.
--
Bobby G.



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On 10/15/2015 09:04 PM, Robert Green wrote:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/261186

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LQhf17i33g

Some nerd had a sense of humor and too much time on his hands to have a computer play Beethoven as its swan song.
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Shoulda played "Heatwave" by Martha and the Vandelas or at least "Light My Fire" by the doors. Or maybe Glen Frey's "The Heat is On."
I have a few exploded AMD CPUs in the "Drawer of Horrors" - blew the corner of the chip right off.
--
Bobby G.



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On Thu, 15 Oct 2015 23:04:55 -0400, "Robert Green"

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AFAIK, newer computers use less power than old ones. I5's and I7's run pretty cool. 84-90 watts. And LED's use less power than CRT's. SSD's use less power than spinners. High end graphics cards can get hot, but you might not need one.
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<stuff snipped>

When I switched from PIII and IV towers to laptops the power dropped from 150W to 17W per machine. With 10 machines throughout the house, that ended up be quite a visible savings on the power bill. Same for the new refrigerator and air conditioners. The switch to LEDs has been a little less dramatic because I was transitioning from CFLs, not incandescents.

Few people do and kids seem to want Play Stations and X-boxes now instead of PCs and that makes sense. I found nothing twitchier and quirkier than high end graphic cards.
It used to take ATI several versions to get their priciest cards to stabilize. Even then there was always an occasional GPF or BSOD in the middle of a game. I'm very happy using laptops and since I use them to power much larger monitors, I can get units with cracked screens for a song on Ebay. The only game still on any of my PCs (a retired tower unit I light up every now and then) is Tiberian Sun "Command and Conquer." The little soldiers are always polite and respectful, even after you've sent then on a suicide recon mission.
--
Bobby G.



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Maybe it's time to upgrade your computer...
I have a new-ish quad-core i7-4790K, 16GB RAM, 1 TB internal hard drive, 1TB external hard drive, 256GB SSD, 1 TB SSD, fanless GTX750 graphics card, TV tuner card, firewire card, Samsung LCD monitor, cable modem, and wireless router.
The whole she-bang runs on a Cyberpower UPS and only uses 81 watts under typical loads (displayed on the UPS). That drops to around 60 at night when I turn off the monitor and the hard drives power down.
That's basically equivalent to a single incandescent light bulb.
If I really push it processing videos, I can get it up to 130 watts or so, but that's short lived.
Heat output is minimal. CPU-ID hardware monitor shows my CPU running at 98F degrees, the other components are at 85F-94F degrees. That's less than my own body heat (98.6F). :)
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 7:32:58 PM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

Kind of what I was thinking too.... Using an i7 here and can barely hear the fan, there is no bulk air flow that you can feel blowing out the back with your hand. Power supply is smaller than what they typically were 20 years ago and back then you could feel the air blowing out the back, sometimes with multiple fans. The have had an energy star program to reduce PC power use for a couple of decades now.
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I work in a quiet home office so I don't want to listen to computer fans all day. I replaced all of my CPU and case fans with these GELID FN-PX12-15 fans. Absolutely silent unless I'm really pushing the system hard.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835426015

I have an Antec 650 watt power supply, but am obviously only using a fraction of the power it can supply.

Yeah, before I upgraded my computer a few years back, my computer provided a bit of heat under my desk. I was surprised by the temperature difference after upgrading.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On 10/14/2015 10:16 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

When the power goes out, most every type of residential heat will be out. Electricity is used for controls , blowers, circulators, oil burnerw. Wood and coal make good backup.
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Per Ed Pawlowski:

We have nat gas. During power failures, the house (including furnace blower) pulls 800-1200 watts in "Lifeboat" mode and a 2 KW gennie covers that nicely.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Wednesday, October 14, 2015 at 2:28:55 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I think his point was that with gas, oil, etc, a small generator can be used to run the blower and controls. With an electric furnace, not so much.
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