duct tape is drying out on ducting

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I've noticed that over time (a year or so) our duct tape is drying out and falling away from the heating ducts that are located in the ceiling of our heated - but unfinished - basement. It is used to wrap the tubular joints of some of our basement ducting along with our clothes dryer vent ducting connection to the outside.
I can understand the heat from the duct is drying out the adhesive... Any suggestions on this ? I mean, isn't that what duck/duct tape is for; sealing a tubular duct joint.
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On Mon, 07 Nov 2005 00:58:54 GMT, "Phil Schuman"

Good hvac installers no longer use duct tape because of this very problem. You can by something called "duct mastic" from your local heating and air supplier. You may also be able to get it at home depot or lowes, not sure about that though. you paint it on with a brush at the seams and it dries rubbery hard. It will seal your ducts up tight.
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The cloth stuff, the silver stuff at least, does not hold up. You need a roll of the foil stuff.
aem sends....
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On Mon, 07 Nov 2005 00:58:54 GMT, "Phil Schuman"
:I've noticed that over time (a year or so) :our duct tape is drying out :and falling away from the heating ducts :that are located in the ceiling of our heated - but unfinished - :basement. :It is used to wrap the tubular joints :of some of our basement ducting :along with our clothes dryer vent ducting connection to the outside. : :I can understand the heat from the duct is drying out the adhesive... :Any suggestions on this ? :I mean, isn't that what duck/duct tape is for; :sealing a tubular duct joint.
I don't know why, but the duct tape I put on the exhaust duct from my water heater has held up fine and it's been over 10 years since I applied it. It's just above the water heater, and it turned black with age, but has shown no signs of wanting to come off. I don't remember using an unusual sort of duct tape.
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I've noticed that over time (a year or so) :our duct tape is drying out :and falling away from the heating ducts :that are located in the ceiling of our heated - but unfinished - :basement. I've noticed that over time (a year or so) :our duct tape is drying out :and falling away from the heating ducts :that are located in the ceiling of our heated - but unfinished - :basement.
I would use a good quality cloth duct tape to re tape the joints or the more expencive Foil tape made by a company called Fasson.(silver with red letters) which ever way you go make sure to clean and and all dust and dirt off the pipe before you reseal it. Steve
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wrote:

Why did you tape the vent on your water heater? Did you think the tape would prevent the carbon monoxide inside the pipe?
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wrote:
:
: wrote: :> :> :I've noticed that over time (a year or so) :> :our duct tape is drying out :> :and falling away from the heating ducts :> :that are located in the ceiling of our heated - but unfinished - :> :basement. :> :It is used to wrap the tubular joints :> :of some of our basement ducting :> :along with our clothes dryer vent ducting connection to the outside. :> : :> :I can understand the heat from the duct is drying out the adhesive... :> :Any suggestions on this ? :> :I mean, isn't that what duck/duct tape is for; :> :sealing a tubular duct joint. :> :> :> I don't know why, but the duct tape I put on the exhaust duct from my :> water heater has held up fine and it's been over 10 years since I :> applied it. It's just above the water heater, and it turned black with :> age, but has shown no signs of wanting to come off. I don't remember :> using an unusual sort of duct tape. : :Why did you tape the vent on your water heater? Did you think the tape :would prevent the carbon monoxide inside the pipe?
Well, believe it or not I took an empty can such as you find in the supermarket filled with green beans and cut off the other end (both ends removed) and used that to go over the vent on top of the water heater, and attached it to the duct that leads to the wall. I don't remember why I had to do that. Maybe a section of the duct had broken or worn through. Anyway, the duct tape I used to join all this together has never given up the ghost. It's tight and hard at this point and it's charcoal black. :
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Dan_Musicant wrote:

My asbestos wrapped pipes seem OK! No additional drying.IThe best duct tape I've used is either by Tesa or Nashua, green $12 a roll at Sportsmans Guide. It actually stretches somewhat, but is the best I've ever used. Most of the other sold at stores is not comparable at all.
greg
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wrote:

adhesive...
with
Some instructions for products like a bathroom fan or a clothes dryer state:
Don't use duct tape to secure ducts, it may dry and no longer hold. Use metal clamps made for securing ducts.
Seems like the safest idea to me. :)
Dugie
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wrote:

Actually, pros dont use "duct tape" any more...for anything other than maybe a quick securing of a ladder to a rack....
If its wrapped metal duct, depending on the wrap, a metal tape with an acrylic adhesive is used. If its flex, tapes not used at all..no tape...bands made just for that are used.

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Only reason duct tape doesnt hold anymore is because american companies are tightassed profit driven outfits who over the years have just made their products cheaper by cutting back on quality. I know whole subdivisions with duct joints sealed with gray cloth duct tape that are still stuck after 25 years.
Yes...nowadays its best to use mastic tape....dont use the thin foil....it lasts about as long as the cloth tape used today....
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Two kinds of foil...one is cheap shit...really, and I agree with you 100%..it uses a rubber adhesive that sucks ass after about a year. the other, is UL181-A and B rated..its about $40 a roll...now THAT works, but the code guys here finally got smart, and even with it, you need to use a mastic over it... The mastic tapes nice too...but its a pain in the ass if you EVER have to go back in...with the foil tape first, then mastic over the top of it, you can just peel it all off at a later date if you need to, and if any screws are covered, they come out clean and neat this way.
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Try <http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2180&cat=1,110,43466>
--
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This is Turtle.
So you the one that is not duct taping the flex joints after you put the plastic bands on them. if you bump the metal starting collar at joints just a little it will fall off but if tapped after the plastic strap is used. It will never come off. i sure wish these Rookies would learn !
TURTLE
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Umm..and if you butter the take off before, and mastic the outer lip when done..its forever too and looks much neater.... Like I said...the pros aint using tape anymore on ducts...Turtle still is.
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I had a roll of duct tape that dried on the roll. It was near impossible to get it off the roll, then it would delaminate. I finally trashed it.
On 8 Dec 2005 11:15:56 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@pitt.edu wrote:

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you can get the metal tape, that is aluminum, by the roll .that holds up well.
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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Phil Schuman wrote:

Standard duct tape should never be used for ducts or any permanent use. Ducts should use the foil tape made for that use and sold in the heating duct area not the tape area.
For any use over about 6 months the cloth duct tape should not be used.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Building code has been metal tape around here for years.
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Replace it with mastic. Even the best duct tape tends to fail these days, the adhesive dries out.
--
hwm54112
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