Drywall Taping Question


When you have a joint where neither edge of the drywall is a tapered edge, do you use joint tape? I always have a problem finishing those joints off to look good. The combination of the tape and the joint compound causes a bulge and the always causes me problems.
David
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Yes
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Yes tape as you would the tapered edges...After it dries go down BOTH sides with your 12 inch knife/trowl...There will be a ridge of mud in the center...Don't worry about it and just scrape it off after it dries...Now coat the butt by going down the center with your 12 inch knife/trowl....After it dries go down BOTH sides like you did the first time only this time pull it tight...Think skim coat...Sand it and it should be good....
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hibb wrote:

A butt joint

Yes.
You might want to try these: http://www.trimtexinc.com/installation/Buttboard%20Cutsheet.pdf
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wrote:

Definitely tape - and taper the compound of the joint over 12-18 inches.
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wrote:

Use very thin layers of joint compound and allow the compound to dry for 1 day before sanding/applying the next coat. The sticky mesh tape is a lot easier to work than the paper tape.
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I trim back the paper on the adjoining butt edges at a 45, just taking off about 1/8" of paper, and use paper tape on the joint if I want it really flat. Cutting back the paper facing leaves a sharper, smoother edge than the factory or cut butt edge, and it is less likely to create a bump in the tape. The little recess that is created by cutting back the paper allows the drying paper tape to be sucked into the joint a bit, and that allows the followup coats to be thinner. You'll have to feather out the edges a good bit regardless, but reducing the height of the high point at the center is a critical first step in getting it flat.
If you need dead flat, you'll need to skim coat the wall of float the joint between the studs. The ButtBacker board someone posted works well for that, but I usually just make my own with a strip of plywood and a couple of thin pieces of solid cardboard.
R
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