Drywall priming - Oil or Latex

I'll be painting my new room addition in the next few days and am still in a quandary over whether to use a latex or oil based primer. The addition itself will have a flat latex final coat, while the adjoining kitchen will have a semi gloss topcoat. All areas are new drywall.
Any advice appreciated!
Mark
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what are you going to use as the finish paint? Problem solved.
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At big box stores such as home depot, they sell latex or acrylic primer especially for the first drywall coating. Maximum adhesion of final coat, and good wallboard sealing features. Technically, whether you use latex or oil topcoat, any formulation of primer, oil or latex, will work fine as an undercoating, but since there are formulas just for new walls, you might as well use them..
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And, there are some "latex" primers that are touted as acting as vapor barrier. No significant difference in price, IIRC.
For best results, you might even want to apply (2) coats to the wallboard joints- a light one on the joints, then the whole deal.
HTH, J
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Make your life easy - latex drywall primer :-).
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Luke
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In case you werent aware, there are specific primers for new drywall. They're supposedly formulated to give the best adhesion/coverage for the drywall/joints etc., and IMO worked well. It's been a number of years since I've used it, but as I recall it was a latex primer, or at least water based. As long as you don't ever plan to use oil paint on it, which would be unusual in my opinion, a made-for-the-application makes the most sense to me. I do however use oils on woodwork, things like that. But for the walls latex seems far more available and with a lot more colors/finishes to choose from.
HTH, Pop
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As most here have said, latex. It's the thing to use for new drywall. There's just no reason to use oil on walls anymore.
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You can use either but latex is preferred for new drywall especially as you will be using latex topcoats. Personally, I always use the pigmented shellac known as BIN made by Zinsser. You have to deal with the flammable alcohol fumes when applying it but it dries in 1-2 hours so you can start topcoating quickly.
Good Luck.

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mwl wrote:

The question came up very recently - Benjamin Moore's website has product info with technical stuff for all their products. One said that latex primer is preferred for new drywall, and they had the specifics for one of their many primers. You can probably put oil or latex over the primer. Check with a decent paint store.
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mwl wrote:

Use Kilz primer and sealer. Sold at all Home Depots, works great and you can even have it tinted with your base color to help with the final coat. I use it and I usually can get away with a single coat of final coat. It will also block out most stains from reappearing. Costs about 12.00 gallon. Can get it in 5 gallons too.
Rich
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mwl ( snipped-for-privacy@excite.com) said...

A latex primer and sealer will work just fine, regardless of the finish paint.
Even so, I highly recommend TWO coats of primer on walls and ceilings. The extra coat goes a long way to ensure an even sealing over the entire wall, especially if latex paint is to be used for the final coat. What I have found is that areas where there is mud compared to where there is just plain drywall will absorb the moisture from latex paint differently, making them dry differently, which makes them more visible. Two coats of primer helps ensure a good even sealing of the surface.
In our home, baseboard and trim were primed once before being installed. They were all installed after the first coat of primer was done on the walls, then nail holes and joints were filled and sanded. The second coat of primer went over the walls and trim together.
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Calvin Henry-Cotnam
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2 good zinsser products bin shallac or new product on zinnsser web page a special acrillic named gardz made for sheetrock and unpapered sheetrock or plaster. stan
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