Drilling foundation for condensate line.

My split system 's air handler is located in my crawl space. I have been th inking of drilling a hole in the side of the foundation to run a pvc line o ut for a condensate drain. The hole would need to be below the dirt level o utside. I would burry the pipe and run it down hill to daylight at my drive way. Would this be a problem or would frilling a hole underground cause moi sture/water problems?
Thanks,
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On 06/15/2015 8:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not necessarily, but it's always going to end up as a "weak link" as a potential entry point as any sealant has a possibility of a failure. The level of risk depends heavily upon overall drainage and the amount of water/rainfall one has in an area and the like of which we "know nuthink!" from the posting so no way to judge.
One way this is done routinely is via a condensate pump to raise the level and then the the exit line can be above grade and buried if desired. The main unit here is in the basement and is so equipped altho it just goes down a drain it travels overhead to get there. Been that way for 35+ yr now with no problems. We put in a new system a few years ago as an efficiency upgrade (primarily on the furnace side) and out of general principles put in a new condensate pump altho the original was still running fine and no indications it wouldn't have continued indefinitely but figured after 30 yr or so it deserved a rest...just as an indication of reliability.
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On Monday, June 15, 2015 at 10:11:56 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

Condensate pumps have advantages and disadvantages. Disadvantage is that it's a pump and pumps that cycle a lot don't last. I just had a Little Giant that was 3 years old crap out due to a failed switch. It was replaceable, but still cost me $20. But given the requirements so far, a pump sounds like a viable solution here.
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On 06/15/2015 11:59 AM, trader_4 wrote: ...

Well, as said, the one that we replaced just on general principles when replaced the furnaces was 30+ and still going strong...I forget the brand; it was supplied by the HVAC contractor though, not just some box store throwaway. I have every expectation the one there now will be there after I'm gone...
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On Monday, June 15, 2015 at 3:26:39 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

I hope you're right. But Little Giant isn't a throw away, AFAIK either. From all that I see, they are one of the major manufacturers. A lot of stuff that lasted 30+ years, doesn't last if you buy it new today. HVAC equipment itself is a good example. See my thread about the 4 year old condenser fan that just died on mine. Old one, 25 years old, like your condensate pump, was still working when it was hauled away.
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On 06/15/2015 5:26 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Well, I guess if it goes, I'll just put the other one back; it's sitting in the back room in a box...
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On Monday, June 15, 2015 at 8:45:58 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

out for a condensate drain. The hole would need to be below the dirt level outside. I would burry the pipe and run it down hill to daylight at my dri veway. Would this be a problem or would frilling a hole underground cause m oisture/water problems?

I would be a little concerned about what might crawl up the pipe.
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On Monday, June 15, 2015 at 8:45:58 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

out for a condensate drain. The hole would need to be below the dirt level outside. I would burry the pipe and run it down hill to daylight at my dri veway. Would this be a problem or would frilling a hole underground cause m oisture/water problems?

Agree with dpb...I have seen these in operation (14 yrs at work) without a problem) http://www.supplyhouse.com/Little-Giant-554401-VCMA-15UL-65-GPH-Au tomatic-Condensate-Removal-Pump-14719000-p?gclid=Cj0KEQjw7_mrBRDH4Y2UjLHE mfcBEiQA8OTHf3JBughcH3FE2bBfAoJmiobON-PKQPmoiQeyEv3Agq8aAhLE8P8HAQ
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On 06/15/2015 9:33 AM, bob_villa wrote:

Tho I was going to note that the very same basement drain that the condensate above goes out of _does_ penetrate the basement wall below grade (as well as do electric and water service entrances) so there's no real gain regarding penetrations here on that regard... :)
Then again, it doesn't rain a tremendous amount here and with reasonable drainage water has never been an issue in the basement. Couldn't say that for some other places I've lived or necessarily for everywhere...
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On Monday, June 15, 2015 at 4:37:50 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

ine out for a condensate drain. The hole would need to be below the dirt le vel outside. I would burry the pipe and run it down hill to daylight at my driveway. Would this be a problem or would frilling a hole underground caus e moisture/water problems?

H-Automatic-Condensate-Removal-Pump-14719000-p?gclid=Cj0KEQjw7_mrBRDH4Y2U jLHEmfcBEiQA8OTHf3JBughcH3FE2bBfAoJmiobON-PKQPmoiQeyEv3Agq8aAhLE8P8HAQ

i ran the condensate line to the sanitary sewer alongside the washing machi ne drain hose.
that passed TWOhome inspections and the community sewer inspection.
probably easier to use pump to a convenient sewer connection
mine goes in the washtub
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