Driftwood as firewood?

I've recently moved into an old house with a wood-burning fireplace. My house is near a beach and there's lots of driftwood there. Is there anything wrong with burning driftwood in a fireplace? The driftwood seems clean. Thanks.
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The driftwood may look dry but actually have a fairly high moisture content. Some of that wood may also be pressure-treated which should not be burned.

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Or, If this is saltwater, using it may rust out the stove and chimney.
Bob
wrote:

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Humbug! The salt may, however, help remove built up creosote.
Bob F wrote:

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i got driftwood off the banks of the ohio for decades. if dry,it usually burns pretty fast as the soaking seems to take something out of it.. but free and easy to pick up.no side effects i could see in my wood stove and chimmney. sometimes id put a wet peice in a hot fire,,it would burn after a while. lucas
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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Remi wrote:

Nothing at all wrong with it. Best to cut and stack for a month or two to be sure it is dry. The only problem is cutting it, even if it looks clean, it will have sand/dirt embedded in cracks and crevices - may have to sharpen your saw more often.
If it is on salt water there is an added benny in the wood should burn with some colorful flames due to the bit of salt that will be on/in the wood.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Every stove manufacturer will tell you to never burn driftwood in their stoves, and most (not all) will tell you not to burn driftwood in their manual. I would be worried about the thing you can control, and that is salt in driftwood. Its pretty common knowledge that salt is corrisive to metal. And in the presence of heat, that chemical reaction happens faster. Manufactures are hip to what driftwood damage looks like, and good luck claiming a warrenty claim on a premature rusted out stove. Enjoy the pretty colors.
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snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote:

Care to supply a cite to a manual containing that? It certainly wasn't in my stove manual or the manual with the prefab chimney I installed years ago. Minus a cite, it sounds like just another old wives tale to me.
Harry K.
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Harry K wrote:

My pacific energy wood burning insert states it in the manual. My vermont castings manual at the summer home states it as well. Burn it anyways. When your stove / stack becomes pitted and rusted forget any warrenty parts replacement. And yes, google it. Not only for stove damage but for what salt turns into when heated and burned and vents from the stack.
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Bob F suggests that if it's saltwater it could rust out my chimney. Is this true? (It is saltwater).

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Do a Google search on "burn driftwood stove" or "burn driftwood fireplace".
Harry

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says...

Is your chimney metal or masonry? Burning salt-water driftwood with a metal chimney is definitely an invitation to rust.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
  Click to see the full signature.
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My fireplace is masonry.
is Joshua Putnam

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These guys do http://www.uaf.edu/coop-ext/ruraldevelopment/pdfs/driftwood.pdf#search=%22driftwood%20firewood%22
They say no, but give no reason. http://www.canren.gc.ca/prod_serv/index.asp?CaId 3&PgIda4 Never Burn
a.. Wet or green wood b.. Household garbage such as plastic or cardboard c.. Painted or stained wood d.. Pressure-treated wood e.. Particleboard or plywood f.. Ocean driftwood g.. Glossy magazines h.. Any materials prohibited by local by-laws
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

http://www.uaf.edu/coop-ext/ruraldevelopment/pdfs/driftwood.pdf#search=%22driftwood%20firewood%22
Depends on what one means by driftwood. Lots of wood (especially timbers) drifting in the ocean and piled on beaches contains all sorts of toxic stuff--oils, tars, creosote, and various other preservative. So no, one should not burn that stuff in a stove.
If by driftwood one means actual tree trunks and branches that were obviously never treated with preservatives, there should be no problem in burning it.
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I lived on the coast of Oregon for almost twenty years, and only burned ocean drift wood. It was my only source of heat for my living room and kitchen. Just two things. 1) you really need to let it dry out for a few months if possible, so overstock, cover in a dry place and itll be fine, I found outdoors preferable, but covered.
2) You will go through saw blades faster because of the salt content and various other reasons, so either learn how to sharpen whatever kind of saw blade you will be using, or find someone, who will do it unexpensively for you. Maybee barter some wood for sharpening.
I always used a two person hand saw, so I dont know if this would apply to a power chain saw or not.
Much regards
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replying to J.Lef, JO wrote: Have a 5 year old Harman TL300 stove that I burned kiln dried-not treated- firewood in. Just had to replace it as it has been "gutted" by corrosion as the wood was sourced from logbooms sitting in saltwater. I have seen firsthand what saltwater wood will do to a stove that should have lasted me 20-25 years.
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On Sunday, October 1, 2006 at 8:48:51 PM UTC-5, Remi wrote:

Well, the OP was 10 years ago, he should have been thru at least one stove by now.
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