Dremel/mototool "bits"

Page 1 of 3  
I tend to use my (off-brand) mototool as a grinder/minirouter. So, most of the 8,000 bits in these "kits" are useless sanding disks, sanding drums, etc. Essentially useless for my needs.
I'd like to buy a similar "kit" of USEFUL (to me) metal bits. Like:
<http://www.harborfreight.com/diamond-point-rotary-bit-set-20-pc-69653.html> <http://www.harborfreight.com/high-carbon-steel-rotary-rasp-set-10-pc-68830.html>
though I am always leary of HF's quality.
Any other sources of similar "bits"? Or, experiences with either of the above?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Y wrote:

I have a bigger set of the HF diamond points . Don't overheat them or the diamonds fall off . Otherwise I've had good success using them . The one that came apart was sharpening a chain saw when that happened .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That pretty much says how low the quality of the HF bits are. A chainsaw is not a very hard steel. But that just shows the overall quality of all HF stuff, and is why I dont buy from them, or recommend them. Ive never bought bits for a dremel tool, because I never found them tools real useful for my needs. I got one years ago as a gift, used the bits that came with it a few times, but I would not even know where to find it now. However, I'd suggest the bits from dremel, or another company that makes quality stuff. I've bought off-brand drill bits and they are just a waste of money, as well as a thing to piss me off when I'm trying to drill a hole. The same is true to jigsaw, sawsall, and other saw blades.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

If you think the teeth on an Oregon saw chain are soft low quality steel , you have some learnin' to do . You probably pay someoneto sharpen yours , don't you ?
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not low quality steel, but they are not made from a super hard steel either.
You're right about paying someone, (sort of). I only have an electric chain saw and electric pole chain saw. I gave up on gas powered ones, because I dont use them enough and it seemed everytime I needed to use one, the carb would have to be rebuilt, even though I would drain the gas. If a large tree needs to be dealt with, I trade the wood to someone to cut it down. I dont burn wood anyhow. As for my electric ones, I have a friend who has an actual chain sharpening machine. I take him a 6-pack and he sharpens my chain. It's a perfect job, which I could never do by hand, and he can do it in 10 minutes. It used to take me hours to do it by hand and it still never cut well. It was not worth my time doing it by hand, in fact before I met this guy, I usually just touched it up a few times with a file, then I just bought a new chain. They're not that costly for the small electric saws.
My friend spent big money for that machine, but he uses it all the time. For my occasional use, it would not be worth buying.
I like to do most of my own stuff, but cant see spending hours to sharpen a chain, and still it's not right. Thats why machines are made for jobs like that. Not only do they do a perfect job, but do it in minutes, rather than hours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2016 7:53 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

"Bigger" in terms of number of bits? Or, larger sizes? (I'd prefer a wider range of sizes but suspect the tool doesn't really have enough HP to do much with anything more substantial)

OK, so it's reasonably "capable". (why not a round file and guide for the saw? seems like you're tempting fate with a motorized tool -- Ooops!)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Y wrote:

Bigger as in more in the box . I think mine had something like 50 . I was getting started sharpening my own chains , seemed like a quick way to touch up the chain . It was , but my inexperience let the teeth get out of balance side/side and the saw wandered in the cut and bound . I have since learned how to sharpen a chain properly , and about every 3rd touch-up I use the file guide to insure I keep the correct angles and edge profile . I can turn a 40+ foot red oak that's 16" thru at the bottom into 20" chunks in about an hour - includes lopping limbs and cutting anything 4" and over into stove lengths too .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did not seem to get the hang of sharpning the chain saw with a file and guide to do a very good job. I caught a HF electric sharpner on sale for about $ 30 and it works fine for the few sharpenings I do every year. Probably would want a beter quality if I did lots of chains.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2016 9:49 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I find the hardest part of sharpening (with file/guide) is keeping the saw wedged between my thighs (as I usually sharpen it while I'm in the middle of *using* it -- somewhere in the yard).

Does it have a DIFFERENT sort of built-in guide? I.e., how do you keep from making the sorts of mistakes you'd previously made with the file?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I lay it down. I also don't use the guide, just the round file. Works for me.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/2016 11:10 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

With the blade flat on the ground (or parallel to it)? If so, how do you keep fuel mixture and chain oil from seeping out?

How do you keep the file from wandering too deep into the gullet?

I straddle the saw, bar pointing away from me, so it's not going anywhere. Then, move the chain, by hand, until I can locate a convenient reference (often, two left or two right cutters in a row, instead of alternating; sometimes a different spacing between adjacent cutters).
I *kiss* each left cutter, advance chain to next left cutter, repeat until I've moved through the entire length of the chain. Then, swap hands and do the right cutters.
Guide makes sure the file stays "high" on the cutter (but not TOO high) from one to the next. Witness marks on the top side of the guide help me hold it at the correct angle in relation to the bar.
I have another gauge that I use to check the height of the rakers (and a flat file for those). But, they tend not to need to be tweeked.
Run a finger gently over each tooth to verify they "catch" my flesh, just a bit.
I keep a wrench (to loosen the bar), screwdriver (to adjust bar tension), file and guide in my pocket when using saw. I don't want to let the "inconvenience" of having to return home to fetch them deter me from keeping the saw nice and sharp.
*Big* difference between a "really sharp" chain and one that you've let go a wee bit too long. Usually pretty obvious while you're using the saw: does *it* do the work? Or, do *you* have to PUSH it through the wood?
If I hear a neighbor using a saw, I'll usually wander over to see how much "work" it is for them. As it only takes a few minutes to touch up a chain, I'll often offer to do so -- and watch their eyes light up, afterwards, at how much easier the saw is to use.
[Of course, *they* never seem to grasp the idea that THEY should be doing this instead of forcing a dull saw to do the work...]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 00:50:56 -0700, Don Y

Huh? My old ranger 33 won't leak gas or oil in any position. I still sharpen it sitting upright.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I keep it upright, just put it down.

Just put the file into the round grove. I realize it's the upper part that needs the sharp edge so I press a little upward.

Yes, I get the same "cuts better" effect from sharpening. After Sandy I had a crew come in with one guy that seemed to really know what he was doing. He sharpened his saw the same way. Just a round file.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some seem to have good skills at doing things free hand, but I don't seem to be able to. When I paint I have to tape where I don't want it to go and cover every thing that I don't want painted. The actual paint job looks good, but I make a big mess on the drop cloths. Same with the chain saw. I put mine in a vise in the shop and use file and guide and it just barley cuts beter than before I sharpen it. The HF sharpner works very well for me as after I adjust it, it is just mechanical work and no skill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Feb 2016 10:10:13 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

I can paint freehand better than I can using tape, because tape often bleeds, or pulls off paint when I remove the tape. I just use a quality angle brush.
But I cant sharpen a chain saw worth shit, freehand or even with a guide. I also cant sharpen drill bits, and I've read articles and did everything I was supposed to.... Some things are best left to the pros, and their top of the line machines.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I received a Drill Doctor machine for Christmas a few years ago. Works well on the bits that I never learned to sharpen. No more than I use a drill I probably would have been beter off if I just buy new drill bits any time I needed a sharp one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 7:48 AM, Dan Espen wrote:

Even with the guide, I have an overwhelming "urge" to move the file lower into the gullet. It is only the guide that prevents me from doing so (I invariably have to examine the guide to see why it won't let me put the file where *I* want it to go!)

Keeping it "on hand" (so there's no disincentive to using it) and not getting carried away (trying to remove too much material) seems to make it easier to keep the saw (chain) operating at its sweet spot.
I've a healthy respect for chainsaws; never want to find myself "forcing it" -- to do ANYTHING! :>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


This sharpner looks something similar to a small chop saw or miter saw with an abrasive wheel. YOu place the chain in a guide and adjust the wheel to where you want it to cut and how deep to cut. After that all you have to do is just move the wheel down and up and advance the chain to the next position. When all the teeth going one way are sharpened you move it to the new position and sharpen the other teeth. This is done with the chain off the saw so it does pay to have an extra chain with you if away from the house. The saw cuts great after this as all the teeth are the same.
If I did much sharpening I would get one of the beter quality ones, but I thought for less than $ 30 it would be worth a try no more sharpening than I do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/2016 8:03 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Is this a "judgement call"? Or, does the guide effectively *tell* you where to set the adjustment?
I.e., can you screw this up (and ruin your chain)?

Are you entering the cutter from the *side*? I can't see how you can go "up and down" and still keep the cutting corner with that slight "leading overhang"...

I will have to look at it next time at HF. I suspect the fact that it "requires electricity" (meaning it wouldn't be useful outside the house) may work against it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


YOu do have to adjust the cutting wheel to where you want it to go. If you do not pay attention on where to set it, you could probably cut all the way through the chain. It comes down with the wheel at an angle, maybe around 30 deg off vertical, what ever the chain needs. That is why I tried to compair it to an electric miter saw, one that is made to cut molding for a room. Then the chain is in a movable bracket that you can turn left and right to match the angle of the cut much as a file would need to be held to match the angle of the cutting part of the chain.
You do need to check the settings every time you put another chain on to sharpen.
If you need to cut down the rakes or what ever they are called, you can do that to.
As it does use electricity and requires removing the chain from the saw you would want to carry an extra chain or two with you. Probably quicker to change the chain than to sharpen one in the woods unless you really know what you are doing with the files.
They are usually around $ 40 but often with the coupon from HF you can find them on sale for just under $ 30. There are some comercial duty ones from other companies that start around $ 100 to $ 150. If sharpening lots of chains you would want one of the beter ones, but as I only sharpen a few a year if it does 20 chains for me, it is worth it. I can toss it and buy another. That would get me to an age old enough I should not be fooling with the saws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.