Don't take it apart!

OK, so today I decided I was going to work towards the goal of getting an electric fuel pump mounted in my '55 Stude... first step, I had a right angle drill with no chuck key. I imagine that this will be required to drill the holes in the floor to mount the fuel pump's bracket (going to use riv-nuts to mount it.) So I drag it out, notice that not only do I not have a chuck key, but the cord is badly dry rotted as well. Go to local hardware store, buy chuck and key together for about $8, pick up little rubber strap to hold key on cord, buy $5 extension cord to cut up for new power cord. Am thinking while I'm there that since the extension cords are on sale for so cheap I ought to pick up another one, because I'm sure that I have another old tool that needs a new cord.
Get home, fix right angle drill. Run out to garage to get soldering iron to tin ends of new cord. While I'm there notice ancient B&D 1/4" hand drill that literally came in a toolbox that I picked out of the bed of someone's truck as he was headed to the dump. Appeared absolutely hopeless. Just hadn't thrown it out simply because I figured I'd try it someday and *then* throw it out. Cord looked frightening. Plugged it in, picked it up with a shop rag (yes, bare aluminum case) and wouldn't you know the darn thing hums like a champ.
Several hours later...
Now I've got the thing stripped down to its component parts and all the AL bits have been thorougly degreased and racked in the dishwasher. I have identified that it was probably headed to the dump because the jaws of the chuck were a little munged up, and also the chuck end bushing is badly egged. Other than that, it's PERFECT once you steel wool all the surface corrosion off of it. Plus, it took me longer to get all the grease out of the gearbox and off the associated parts than it did for me to strip it down - only tool required was a flat blade screwdriver, and two pliers to get the chuck off. It looks like it was *designed* to be stripped down every 30 years or so, lubed, and put back together.
I really like this little drill, and here's the kicker - I NEED ANOTHER DRILL LIKE A HOLE IN THE HEAD! I already have a 1/2" Milwaukee, a cheap 3/8" DeWalt, and the aforementioned right angle drill that prompted this whole exercise. That should cover 99% of the typical homeowner/car guy's drilling needs, yes? The issue here is, if I see a good tool that's fixable, I feel a moral obligation to bring it back to its former glory, even if I will NEVER USE THE DAMNED THING. The thing is, though, it's USEFUL and if I hadn't saved it it would have been turned into Pepsi cans, and I just couldn't let that happen.
Please tell me there's a program for this. The girlie is hiding upstairs wondering who the madman in her kitchen is making the sink smell like Brakleen and giving a running commentary on how wonderful 1950s era tools are.
On the upside, I now have three working drills, with a fourth on the way. (just need to wait for the dishwasher to finish, then I can whip out the mics and get on McMaster-Carr's web site to order a new bushing...)
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use the price of a movie ticket for 2 hours of entertainment as a yardstick. Look how many hours entertainment you got for less than the price of a movie ticket! KC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
KC wrote:

That's true, total expenditure so far is a $5 power cord, a little Brakleen, some dish soap, two 1/8" sta-kons, and eventually some bearing grease and whatever a new bushing costs me. And several hours of my life that I won't get back. :)
Sad thing is, this isn't the first time I've done this. Picked up a "busted" 3/8" Makita at a yard sale for $3 once, power cord was bad. Didn't need it. Don't remember who I gave it to...
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

My husband recently got a weed-whip that didn't work for $10. The owner just came by the shop, looking for a little cash. My husband repaired the weed whip and gave it to our lawn guy. The lawn guy drops off bags of citrus and avocadoes because he has a neighbor with over-supply. The lawn guy is a hard worker, with his wife, does good work. He said he was glad to get the weed whip because his neighbor borrows his power tools and he didn't want to loan the one he uses for work. Proof tools are immensely useful :o) This one had four different uses for four different people: raise money, repay favors, do favors, cut weeds :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

Yeah, but you are earning karma and tree-hugger points. Every tool restored to service is one less tool in the landfill, and hopefully one less modern plastic raygun tool made and sold. I have a rechargable drill (among others) and love it, but since they didn't make the batteries a universal standard, there is a big surge in perfectly good tools with dead batteries, headed to the dump. Once they are a few years old, new batteries are not cost-effective, assuming you can find them at all. Not at all like a corded tool that can be MacGyvered 40 years later, like you seem to be so good at. And like the other guy said, it is usually cheap entertainment, and pretty harmless as hobbies go. At least the SWMBO knows where you are from the smell of solvent and grease.
By the way, it is big club- I can't bear to throw out a good tool either, even if it is a little beat up. Every scratch and dent on it speaks to me, of actual work getting done, versus shoveling paper in a circle like I do for a living.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Nate Nagel" wrote:

FIVE DOLLARS? I've got a shopping bag *full* of them, each acquired for the cost of $FREE.
You need to work on your scrounging skills, son! :)
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When my father in law passed away my wife and I started cleaning up his shop. He never threw any tool away. We found dozens of old drills and saws dating from present to back to the the 50s. Most of the old stuff was as you described. Usually a new power cord or brushes was all that was needed to repair them. Those that were totally FUBAR usually had armatuers that were worn beyound repair. On a couple of those I was able to turn the armatuer on a lathe to clean them up. They now work but I think they have seen their last days of work and will become show pieces in their new home. In about 4 years they will be returned to their origonal home when my wife and I move back to her parent's home after I retire..
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.