Do I really need to remove my chimney?

And if so can I do it myself...?
I've posted several times about this new house I'm prepping to live in. The work is going great and I've got about 5 different quote from 5 different HVAC contractors. I'm pretty sure I'm going to go with a 92+ furnace and a high efficiency water heater. The chimney, once used to burn coal, and then more recently, oil, thus no longer serves any purpose.
The chimney is cracking but does not appear horribly dangerous, and there are 8 other houses on the street with the exact same setup. I'm wondering if it would be a real hassle to get up there with a chisel and break it down? I guess there's no harm in keeping it, but I'm trying to compare costs of removing the thing, and just letting it stay.
Here's a picture where you can somewhat see the chimney:
http://flickr.com/photos/talllguy/115005720/in/set-72057594057780280 /
Basically: * How much would it cost to have taken down by someone else? * How hard would it be for me and some friends? * Why not just leave it?
Thanks!
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cracking but does not appear horribly dangerous, and> there are 8 other houses on the street with the exact same setup. I'm> wondering if it would be a real hassle to get up there with a chisel> and break it down. Thanks for the pic. That thing extends a good distance above the roofline. My estimate is 8 to 10 feet. Can you meaure or estimate this distance? My gut feeling is that this way more hassle than it's worth.
>I guess there's no harm in keeping it, but I'm> trying to compare costs of removing the thing, and just letting it> stay.> Here's a picture where you can somewhat see the chimney:

because your roof will a hole in it when this thing is gone. You might get bids from roofers.

easy. It wll be harder to repair the hole in the roof. Do you have any roofing or carpentry skills? You might consider having it removed to the roof line at the same time you are installing a new roof. Then it will be easy to remove the inside portion.

You have not given any reason for removing it. I can think of a couple. Is it is taking up space inside the house that you want to use for somthing else? Are you planning to replace your roof anytime soon? It is a safety concern? Those are the only good reasons I can think of.
Lawrence
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Elliott P wrote:

That picture helps.
If it were mine, I would like to get rid of it, but I would wait until it was time for a new roof. Right now the chimney is likely the weak point in the roof so I would want to get rid of it, but doing so would make a new roofing problem. Much less of a problem to take it out when you re-roof.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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You could put in a wood stove-heater-fireplace if the location is right, that would increase your house value, lower heating bills, and give enjoyment of use. Otherwise block off its draft when new equipment is installed till you decide. I left mine up for a future wood stove, I also went direct vent.
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Get somone to look at it and install screen or covers over the openings so anmals dont make a home, like racoons....
if its not dangerous leave it till your getting a new roof...
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Isn't clear from that picture to me if the chimney goes through the roof or along the back side of the house we can't see. In any case, the key questions are:
Why remove it, except for that it looks ugly?
What has to be done to cover up either the hole or where it runs along the side of the house?
Assuming you want to get rid of it, you can do it yourself, but as someone already pointed out, to do it safely will likely require renting a bucket/lift of some type.
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wrote:

If you don't need it, you could shorten and cap it for now without disturbing the roofing. That would address the cosmetic issue, and would not be a big project. When you need a new roof, you could then remove the rest.
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All comments inline below...

Sounds good - Did you do anything abut the smell?

Not really

Depends - I'll do it for $100 if your within 30 miles of my house, $200 if I need to haul away the rubble. Price does not include patching roof or wall (Cant see from your picture)

Easy, yet potentially dangerous. If its unstable, putting a ladder against it isn't wise. A cherry picker would be useful.

Asthetics.
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You don't *have* to remove it. But I would put it on your list of things to do when you have spare cash - low priority.
I would remove it to keep cold air from getting in. Also may make more space inside the house if it were removed.
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just some thoughts: who: not you,too heavy a job. what does the chimney do?:is it supporting some of the structure? is some of the structure supporting it? will it devalue your home? will the next home buyer want it? will it make your home look odd compared to other similar nearby homes? where: the city ordinances or building code or building permit with plans specifies the present chimney. such as "shall include a chimney so as to..." when: the home was built? why: any historic significance? how: with lots of money. any possible options for ventilating the home's basement needed? radon vent?
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