DIY extension

hello all,
would like some advice as im attempting to do most of the building work on an extension to my house, the blockwork has been built up to joist height and ive started to fix a wallplate onto the wall of the house to run the joists between the old house and new extension........the problem i have is the original wall im attempting to fix a wallplate to, so i can hang my joist off it is made out of hollow block, ive put about 40 masonary screws into it and fit 3 backstraps to the wallplate too....will this enough to take the weight of the floor???? advice really needed and appreciated
Thank You
--
Tom707


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Tom707 wrote:

Best advice I can offer is to spend a few bucks and consult a structural engineer.
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dadiOH
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On 11/12/2012 2:18 PM, dadiOH wrote: ...

+1
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On 11/12/2012 12:11 PM, Tom707 wrote: ...

Doubt it's up to Code reqmt's even if it (initially) holds...
As DadiOH says, you need professional input. I'd be guessing a pocket at a minimum. There's got to be a tie somewhere/somehow...and if you're in an area that has EQ reqmt's or other local conditions it may take something even more exotic.
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On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 18:11:13 +0000, Tom707

Drill thru the block and put some 1/2 inch or thicker threaded rod thru the joist and the block. Put washers and nuts on both sides. I'd put one every 2 to 3 feet.
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Oren wrote:

It could be because he's ashamed of who he is.
He rightly concludes that, as an unknown, he'll be accorded neutral status - at least for a few posts - and that's far, far better than his former positions.
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On Mon, 12 Nov 2012 18:11:13 +0000, Tom707

top of something. Ledger boards are always a make shift way to do it. You are probably thinking of sheet metal hangers too. Even if the engineer says they are structurally strong enough, what happens if they rust a bit?
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Tom:
I agree with the advice to have the ends of your floor joists resting on concrete block walls, not just supported by them as would be the case with a header.
Also, you need blocking between the joists. The whole purpose of bloking between joists is to prevent the joists from twisting under a heavy load. By keeping each joist vertical, you maximize the rigidity of each joist and hence the whole floor.
Really, while you very well could do the physical work yourself, this is not a DIY project. Your house is your biggest investment. Don't put it in jeopardy by designing the addition yourself as well. You need to get an engineering and/or architectural firm involed in designing the addition so that what you build will meet the building code and be safe to live in.
--
nestork


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I'm wondering where you can put an addition on a house today without a building permit. And typically the building permit requires at least some kind of minimal drawings which would address the issue in question, ie how it gets attached to the rest of the house and supported.
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