diff between a 250V 10A fuse and a 32V 10A glass fuse?


I need to replace an AH 10A 250 V glass type fuse and the closest I have is an AGC 10A 32V fuse. They are the same physically, but are they the same electrically? The actual fuse element inside the 32V fuse looks thicker than the 250V fuse.
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Mikepier wrote:

You can substitute a higher voltage rating for a lower one, but not the "other way" around. The 250 volt rating means the fuse will safely open a 250 volt circuit without "exploding" or developing an interal arc which could maintain current flow longer than would be safe.
Keep looking...
Jeff
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If the voltage the fuse is controlling is 32V or less, it will be fine. If it is a 115V appliance - not so.
Bob
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Mikepier wrote:

Others have already answered the question of using a lower voltage-rated fuse in a higher voltage application as a definite no.
As far as the apparent visible size of the element from one fuse to another, that's a design consideration related to the material composition, fuse response time, etc. Since dissipated power is I^2 * R, the current to melt the fusible link is dependent on R which is obviously intimately related to the material, etc.
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Thanks for all of your inputs. I look for the right fuse.
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wrote:

The 32 volt fuse may not interupt the fault without blowing up.
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Is this for a microwave, proper replacement fuses are available at many stores.

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

32V one is most likely for DC circuit use.
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A simple fuse doesn't care if it's AC or DC, and there are low-voltage AC circuits that need fuses. What does matter is the voltage rating.
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Zero crossings may be used by AC fuses to help extinguish the arc. Some fuses are AC only, some have lower voltage ratings on DC.
Swithes have AC-DC limits also. Quiet switches we commonly use break the circuit slowly and use the AC zero crossings to help extinguish the arc. Quiet switches are probably all AC-only. DC requires a fast snap action.
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