Dental Vacuum pump - Need info

I just acquired a Dentsply DEU-2 pump assembly removed from a dental practice. It has 1" copper input and output lines, and a pressure regulator and solonoid valve assembly going to a 1/2 inch copper line going out. (for water?) There are 2 pumps, each with a 3/4 HP motor. I am trying to figure out what the requirements are for these pumps to work. Do they need water for lubrication? Is that what the water line is for? Was there a tank ahead of this unit to catch the crud, or did it run everything through the pumps? What maintenance would the pumps require?
If anyone knows anything about these units, I would greatly appreciate hearing from you.
Bob
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On Wed, 25 May 2005 07:13:50 -0700, Bob wrote:

And what the fuck would these pumps have to do with "alt.home.repair"??? Go ask in a dental newsgroup.
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He didn't say he was using them for dental purposes. He may want to use them to clean his fish tank or sump pump. That is within the realm of this group.
Most vacuum pumps require water to make a seal to draw the vacuum. Most require little maintenance. Dentsply is still around so you may want to try contacting them for a manual or the pump maker on the nameplate. AFAIK, Dentsply made the assembly, not the actual pumps.
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regulator
(for
figure
water
ahead
pumps?
Feel free to name an appropriate "dental" newsgroup. I couldn't find one before I posted here.
There are lots of people here with useful real life experience. I guess you are not one of them.
Perhaps someone with experience with these units may see my posting and help me.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

His life experience has taught him to respond to all situations with "What the fuck do I care?"
If this works for him, we should all rejoice in the happiness of an individual soul.

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On Wed, 25 May 2005 09:49:54 -0500, RE: Re: Dental Vacuum pump - Need

Wow! What a scum-bag your are Dan. The guy asked a reasonable question.
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On Wed, 25 May 2005 16:36:07 -0500, Caesar Romano wrote:


He did? Dental pumps are somehow on-topic in a Home Repair newsgroup? Would it be OK to ask questions about racing cams in a big-block Chevy engine too? How about the merits of alternative medicine? Would those questions be "reasonable" too?
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Bob wrote:

GOOGLE: Dentsply vacuum pump for starters
--

Jim

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regulator
(for
figure
water
ahead
pumps?
I have already done an hour of web search, and can find no hook-up or operation descriptions. I was hoping someone with experience on these types of units might be lurking here.
Bob
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wrote:

I did my earlier research on recycling refrigerator compressors for airbrush work. Your dental vacuum pump is just a silent fridge compressor used as a vacuum pump. The 2 pump configuration is a two stage set up to get a better vacuum.
Look up any "How they work" books or URLs on the household refrigerator and you will get a pretty good idea of the innards of these single cylinder hermetically sealed compressors.
If you want to you can dismantle your two unit setup and use each unit independently as a compressor or as a vacuum pump. The canister is welded shut thus "hermetically sealed." Its a high pressure vessel therefore a bugger to cut open. Don't unless you have a wreaked unit and want to find out what's inside.
The only difference from regular compressors is that these sealed units are meant to run with an oil bath inside the sealed canister. Its just ordinary motor oil so if you do dismantle the units don't tilt the canister or you will have a pool of oil on the floor. The oil serves several purposes: to lubricate of course, to act as a solvent for the refrigerant (no refrigerant in dental vacuum pump) and to cool the compressor. The cooling solution is neat. The commutator end of the motor dips into the oil bath. When the compressor is run oil is drawn up the hollow motorshaft-compressor crankshaft assembly. This oil spews out like a garden spray at the top and then runs down the sides of the canister. The solution is the oil picks up heat from compression when it was drawn through the shaft. This oil is cooled as it runs down the canister sides. Neat.
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regulator
(for
figure
ahead
pumps?
These pumps have no similarity to refridgeration compressors. they are composed of a 3/4 HP motor bolted to a pump which is a few inches in diameter and 2 inches or so deep. My suspicion is that they are flexible vane pumps which would require some water for lubrication.
Bob
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wrote:

Any possibiity of posting a photo? The key requirement in a dental practice is to minimisize the noise plus deliver clean air or vacuum. I went to a dental supplies store for mold making materials and went through their comperssor - vacuum selection. They were all glorified fridge compressors, glorified in that there was a lot of fancy attachments but still the basic fridge canister compressor. Same thing from a supplier at an industrial equipment show.
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wrote:

One clue concerning water cooled or dry.. Does it have cooling fins on the outside of pump? Aircraft vacuum pumps are similar, and are dry but need cooling fins. Modern medical offices use remote vacuum pumps with pipes run throughout building. Vacuum is supplied to top of a canister near dental chair to collect gunk. Bottom of canister has flapper valve type setup to empty gunk into drain after vacuum is turned off.
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DENTSPLY International World Headquarters Susquehanna Commerce Center 221 W. Philadelphia Street P.O. Box 872 York, PA 17405-0872 USA Tel: (717) 845-7511 1-800-877-0020
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figure
water
Of course. I already know this. From their website, it doesn't appear they manufacture these units anymore. No useful information is available on their site as far as I can find. I don't really expect the manufactuer to want to have a theory of operation discussion on this.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

Pick up the phone. Let them tell you no instead of assuming it. You'll probably be surprised. The tech help guys like giving tech help.
R
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