Cutting on a butcher block counter?

One of my ideas is to have a section of my counter to be end-grain butcher block. Many people install butcher block counters. But do they use them to cut on? I tend to think not. Were I to install a section it would be only 10" wide (based on the cabinet underneath that would have to be built to a different height). I could see having it 1/4" higher than the rest of the counter.
My question is keeping it clean. Cutting boards people stick in the sink to clean. Obviously I can't do that. Looking on the web I see chopping block tables.
I would mostly use it to cut up vegetables. Maybe use a cutting board for meat and fish?
I gather a soapy dishcloth would work?
Does anyone here cut on such a counter?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Yep, had something similar to what you describe, never again.
Didn't really see any advantage to several nice thick cutting boards to place on the counter top.
We were sorry we had it. Tough to keep looking clean.
Good luck, Bob
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On Tuesday, May 7, 2013 1:07:41 PM UTC-6, Don Wiss wrote:

DON'T DO IT...YOU WILL BE SORRY. USE A PORTABLE CUTTING BOARD.
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If your portable cutting board is too large to put in the sink, then saw off some of it. In my opinion, butcher block counter tops are for show ONLY.....
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wrote:

I have maple counter tops in the kitchen but we don't cut on them.
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Don Wiss wrote:

Of course they cut on them. What else? ___________

I don't have a counter of end grain wood but I do have a small, end grain chopping block. Also a couple of cutting boards. We cut on all of them, mostly the small one. Been cutting on it for about ten years now but it is close to unmarred; a new coat of oil would hide that and a light sanding + oil would fix it like new.
I would never, ever - under ANY circumstance - put any wooden cuttingboard, wood handled knife, etc. in the sink if you were thinking of immersing it. Yes, a damp rag/sponge/paper towel with a touch of detergent works.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Had one in my last house. Actually, it was a 24" piece that was the top of a dishwasher and not attached to the rest of the counter Unlike others here, we used it all the time. It would be easy to remove to refinish if needed and was easy to keep clean.
Back when the dinosaurs roamed the earth I worked after school in a grocery store and butcher shop. My job at closing time was to clean the butcher block tops. First we used a metal scraper, then washed it with a bleach solution. Never let it soak.
Caring for a wood board is fairly easy. it is supposed to be used and look used. It is a tool, not a showpiece like the rest of the counter may be.
Our entire kitchen is used. We also have commercial grade metal shelves in their with appliances and canisters, that are convenient to get at and use. It is a work place. Meals are eaten in the dining room.
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+1
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"Don Wiss" wrote in message
One of my ideas is to have a section of my counter to be end-grain butcher block. Many people install butcher block counters. But do they use them to cut on? I tend to think not. Were I to install a section it would be only 10" wide (based on the cabinet underneath that would have to be built to a different height). I could see having it 1/4" higher than the rest of the counter.
My question is keeping it clean. Cutting boards people stick in the sink to clean. Obviously I can't do that. Looking on the web I see chopping block tables.
I would mostly use it to cut up vegetables. Maybe use a cutting board for meat and fish?
I gather a soapy dishcloth would work?
Does anyone here cut on such a counter?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Don.. I use a butcher that I cut all veggies an meat and homemade bread on. It is portable. I do bread first, then the veggies and then the meat. After that I spray with diluted bleach and rinse in HOT water. When dry if needed I replenish the wood with mineral oil and let soak in. Never any problems. Could you inset a stainless steel retainer in the place in the counter top first and then the block could be removed for good cleaning? ww
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Don Wiss wrote:

Remember, a cut, no matter how small, on a wooden block is WAY bigger than a harmful bacterium. Whatever gets left behind on a cutting board migrates to the next chopped item.
That's why wooden "butcher blocks" or "tables" are no longer allowed in meat shops. It is virtually impossible to completely disinfect them.
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wrote:

How do you explain that wood board have been proven more sanitary than plastic?
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Doubt that. http://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/magazine-archive1/augustseptember-2007/creating-a-great-cutting-boards-and-wipe-rag-program/
Look to me like it doesn't matter if you follow sanitation guidelines. Wood is a vanity. My wife is a chef and uses plastic, at work and at home. Saves her vanity for crystal and jewelry.
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On Sat, 11 May 2013 18:21:49 -0500, Vic Smith

Wood does have natural antibacterial properties. It's certainly not as durable and more expensive that other materials, though.
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