Cutting Countertop.

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I've pulled and replaced countertop (same piece) several times. This time I think I need to replace some. Just going to use some 9/10 ft store stock stuff.
Question is in regard to cutting to length. All cuts are 90 degrees. Borg does not cut lengths.
I have the reg electric power tool assortment including lame old clunker circular (), another old clunker jig, 10" table Craftsman junker & new kick-ass Hitachi 12" compound miter saws as well as a router. Probably need to get some specific bit(s) and/or blades.
Of course I spoke on the phone with an Orange Borg guy in kitchens. Sounded pretty confident as to recommendations but then again rats are pretty confidient on running a maze. Have no idea if Borg guy has actually run the maze.
I'm sure I'll get several methods as a reply and may take a combo of them for what I decide to do but lets hear it please.
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The best approach is to turn the counter top upside down on saw horses. Protect the contact points with a rag or similar. Draw your cut line on the bottom of the top and the back of the backsplash. Corners are selfdom square, so check and mark accordingly. If you are very good with a circular saw, have at. If not, bolt/screw/double stick tape a straightedge tot eh top to run the saw against (be very careful about going through the finish top). Make your cut, install.
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90 degree cuts are best made with a circular saw equipped with a fine kerf, high tooth count carbide blade.
Always cut from the backside. I usually draw the line and cut the back splash first. Then cut from the splash to the post formed lip raising saw slightly when getting to the lip. Very little chipping occurs with this method and caulk hides what does.
Supporting both sides is important while making the cut.
Colbyt
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Cutting from the backside makes sense. Just like cutting shelving. Blade rotation at cut is up. Finished edge at cut is supported my material. Severely reduces chipping "out" I guess you might call it. Then there's the additional taping sometimes recommended.
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A layer of heavy masking tape centered on the cut line on the finished side is what my neighbor carpenter always recommends to reduce chipping. Double check that you really want 90 degrees on the edge that goes in the corner. us a decent sized square, and double-check by checking the old countertop, assuming that it fit perfectly.
Bob Hofmann
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I was unclear regarding the 90 degrees. Was really trying to say not 45 degrees and no curves.
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Red Green wrote:

Is the material you're cutting flat? (No integral backsplash.)
If so rough cut with a circular saw. Then trim to the exact dimension by placing and clamping a guide on the counter top and then passing your router with a 1/4" or 1/2" router bit over the desired edge.
Boden
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Sorry for not mentioning it does have a backsplash.
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http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip022500wb.html
Red Green wrote:

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On Fri, 14 Nov 2008 16:16:19 GMT, Pat Barber

This link has an index for other projects, nice link.
Index:
http://woodworkingtips.com/etips /
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Looks like a good tip to use a jig. Thickness of plywood would prevent having to raise the saw at the lip of the countertop resulting in a smooth continuous cut.
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Pat:
Thanks VERY much for that link. Just the couple of article pics gave a lot of info.
I made the jig and cut the countertop per the info from this thread and the article. I mean absolutely flawless. The laminate did not chip at all. If the cut edge of the laminate wasn't sharp as a knife blade I wouldn't have even had to abrade it.
Maybe I got lucky and the countertop deserves some credit. Borg countertop at that. One end of one piece was to be against a wall directly with no side splash. Of course wall is not straight. Especially where drywall came to a corner bead. Scribed this with a compass and used a jig saw cutting from the top yet. That edge would get caulk anyway. Still, no chipping.
Used a new Irwin steel plywood blade with like 100+ teeth in a 25 year old B&D 7 1/4 circ saw. Those bearing have been rattling for like 2 years now.
Once again, thanks.
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On 9/14/2012 7:41 PM, Red Green wrote:

Use a printer next time....
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On 9/14/2012 8:53 PM, Dusenberg wrote:

And if you want an electronic version copy and paste works quite well. Give it a name or add keywords that make sense and let the computer index the document and it will be really easy to find.
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Or print to PDF.
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Red Green wrote:

If you have it to repost why don't you just archive that?
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wrote:

Where are you archiving this? Why do you need to repost this to archive it rather than just archive the original? For me, I'd rather print to PDF and keep it on my hard drive but I'll assume you don't want that.
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G'ahead and croak then. I sure as hell don't understand it. I don't even know how to ask an intelligent question about it, since to me, it seems completely out in left field. I'm not lacking some little piece of the puzzle, I can't even figure out what the puzzle is.
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On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 00:35:53 +0000 (UTC), Red Green

I think most object because you are causing a server to hold more repeat information that isn't the best idea.
Don't want you to croak but hope you find a better way for everyone's benefit <g>.
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I don't "object," and I don't think most others do, either. I'm just incredibly puzzled.
What I can't wrap my tiny brain around is this: He *must* have the article stored on his computer, somewhere, in order to repost it. (I know this for sure, because he stated that it was long gone from his news server.) Therefore, it *is* already archived. Maybe it doesn't have the name he wants, or it isn't in the format he wants, or it isn't in the folder he wants, but why would that necessitate re-posting?
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