Cutting cast iron sewer pipe ?

I need to a cut a 4" cast iron sewer line and am wondering whether to use a rental chain type cutter or buy those treated sawzall blade ?
Of course using cutoff wheel would be great if I didn't have to worry about potential explosion from sewer gas .
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Cast iron is funny; some will cut like butter with a Sawzall, but others will resist all attack:-) If you have room to get the chain in, I'd do that.
Jim
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a Milwaukee "AXE" blade on a sawzall will cut through cast iron pipe like butter. it will even cut through a cast iron tub..............3 blades and 2 hours later.
but the chain is always the easiest and fastest way (providing you have the room to wrap the chain around the pipe).
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next time do the math: 1 sledgehammer = 20 minutes
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I just made 2 cuts thru 4" cast iron soil pipe and 2 thru 2". I used a 4" Makita side arm grinder on recommendation of a couple of plumbers. I was surprised at how quickly it went. Started with a used cheap wheel and pretty well used it up in the process. I tried a DeWalt Recip. saw with a new hacksaw blade first and it just made a shinny place on the pipe.
Walt Conner

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Did this recently myself. The sawzall was taking forever; so I put an abrasive cutting blade on the circular saw. Worked like a charm.
FWIW, Joe F.
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I too, did this recently. I needed to move a toilet flange a few inches to the right. I could use an offset flange which gives you 2", however, the original flange and pipe was cast iron in a concrete floor. I used a 3" abrasive wheel on a 6" extender mounted in a router. I used a variac to keep the router running at a slower speed so it wouldn't bend the extension shaft due to small unbalances in the wheel and the extension. Taking is slowly, I was able to make a clean cut about 5" below the floor level. It really didn't take all that long, maybe 10 or 15 minutes. I was then able to mount the offset flange with appropriate iron to plastic conversion hardware. Big job for only 2", but it was necessary for the remodel job.
rb608 wrote:

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My inuition is warniing me about a potential fire or explosion from the sewer gas ( methane & H2S ) if using a high speed spark generating abrasive wheel on a circular saw or angle grinder . I wonder if it is something to worry about .
On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 00:05:11 GMT, "rb608"

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Oops, I forgot to mention, when I did it, I made a "plug" from a bunch of plastic grocery bags. I tied a string around the bundle and pushed it into the pipe. Did the cutting, and then pulled out the "plug." This also prevented me from smelling the sewer gas.
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

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I did it with a hacksaw because I don't own an electric. It was a lot of work and it takes two blades for the two cuts I made to remove a section. I don't recall if I was using the better grade blades or not. John

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