Cutting a 4x4

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<...snipped...>

I was not assuming that, I was simply stating that a standard 7 1/4 inch Circular saw cuts deeper than 1.5 inches. What I did assume was that the OP would recognize this statement for what it said and infer that he was either mistaken in the 1.5" depth of cut limitation, or regard it as a response to his request for recommendations of a differnt type of saw that could make a 1.75" deep cut. My mistake was in assuming that any other readers would also recognize this statement for what it was worth withouth imagining what assumptions I might have had.
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2011 21:40:20 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

That's not the worst of it. My first assumption was a small circ saw. I've been using a 6 1/4 for years. That almost got through 6" x 6" 's cutting 4 sides. The waste broke off on the last cut and I hit the nubs with a file. But he said Skil saw. He might just have a jigsaw. That's the first power saw I owned.
--Vic
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wrote:

There is also an assumption somewhere in there that a 4 x 4 actually is 4" square. It is not.
Steve
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Larry W wrote:

Not to change the subject, but your comment about a reciprocating saw being versatile was made even truer recently when I discovered a SCRAPER blade for my saw!
It was just the thing for removing stick-on tile and I can imagine several additional uses for such a blade, such as removing flaking paint, concrete spills on the driveway, and (with suitable sharpening) sheep shearing.
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Hi Dick,

If you can afford it, and think you will use it in the future, a 12" power miter saw would be the best way to tackle these cuts. No need to get a slider type saw. However, a miter saw won't be able to handle notches. For that you would need to use the circ saw or handsaw then clean it up with a chisel.
The second option is to get a better circular saw that can cut deeper. Most circ saws can cut through a 4x4 in two passes.
Otherwise, for a few cuts like this, a decent handsaw is often faster than the time it takes to hook up an extension cord so you can use the power saw. I have a Stanley "Shark Tooth" saw I picked up at the home center for around $20 or so a few years ago. It's not as sharp as it used to be, but I can still cut through a 2x4 in 5 seconds or less. A 4x4 would be no problem. Just mark your cut on the lumber, then cut carefully with the handsaw. I have a shop full of power tools, and still turn to my handsaw for many quick cuts. It's portable, variable speed, cordless, inexpensive, and takes very little storage space. :)
Anthony
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Either bite the bullet, and buy a 10" compound miter, OR
Get a couple of lath strips, about 3/8" thick by 1.5" wide, and nail them on the board to be cut with small nails. Put them on both sides of the board, and on the side where it will contact the guide properly. A little extra work, but will give a nice looking cut.
Steve
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On Tue, 6 Sep 2011 08:22:03 -0700, "Steve B"

And if you do that- you'll thank yourself every time you use it.
I'm with the others who don't care for the plan you picked -- but no matter what the plan-- and no matter what else you build in the future, being able to make precise cuts at slight angles always comes in handy.
I think if it was 1970 and I was building my shop again- First I'd buy a compressor-- then I'd buy a compound miter saw. I'd still buy the $100 HF compressor-- and if I knew I was going to live this long I'd probably still buy the $500 Bosch compound miter.

I'd probably go with pencil lines and a handsaw-- but that'll work, too.
Jim
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For $110 the 10" HF SCMS isn't too bad.

Last year I replaced my $100HF with a $600 12" Bosch. The HF still works and I'm planning on keeping it for use outside.

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I got a good Dewalt at a yard sale. If I knew these saws were that good, I would have definitely bought one sooner. The new ones with the laser are the cat's meow. If you can figure the angles and transpose those to the saw, WYSIWYG.
Steve
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wrote:

If you have one without a laser, they make laser "pucks" that replace the blade washer/stabilizer for around $25.
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On Tue, 06 Sep 2011 16:48:08 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I have a Craftsman 7 1/4" compound miter slider. A 10" would have made it easier, but it did the trick when I was doing new woodwork. I'm cheap. Thought the laser was basically useless since I match my mark with the fence kerf. Then I found myself trimming to fit. That laser is nice. You can shave 1/32 easily using the laser. More accurate than kerf matching.
--Vic
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On Tue, 06 Sep 2011 17:25:06 -0500, Vic Smith

Yep! I found it amazingly accurate. The only issue I have is that the laser draws on the left edge of the kerf, so all measurements are to the left[*] (unless you add the kerf).
[*] not a real problem, since I'm right-handed and my left is holding the "good" piece.
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I'm left handed and still hold the wood that way. It would be awkward to do it opposite.
I guess the laser could be handy, but I always bring the blade down and touch the mark before starting the saw. That way, I'm sure my holding hand is out of the way.
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I suppose. Not being left-handed, it's hard to imagine working the "other" way.

It's really great on compound miters. Setup is a breeze, just make one "reference" cut and it can be easily matched with the laser.
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