Cut hole in STAINLESS STEEL sink ???

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I hate home improvement programs that say "when we come back from break" and the job is all done.
They were installing a hose sprayer or a detergent bottle or whatever and needed to "drill" a hole in the stainless steel sink. Just showed the install vs the actual DRILLING of the hole.
Now this is thin metal but a b*tch to "drill" through when the hole has to be about 1 to 1 in diameter. I doubt that a VARIBIT will cut this easily.
Would you use BIMETAL hole saw, CARBIDE grit holesaw, or old style CHASSIS PUNCH ( got to be expensive ) ??
What do the PROS use if they need to do this ?
Thanks.
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and
install
be
the pro's use a "Greenlee Punch"
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I use a pointed punch first to mark the spot. Then I drill a small pilot hole, say 3/16". If it's the smaller hole for a water filter or dish washer I use a drill. For the larger holes I use a rotary tool like a Dremel and a short carbide bit working very carefully. It's noisy, but the metal is so thin that it goes quickly.
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...and you can get one at a local electrical supply. I have no idea if they have special versions for hard metals.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.commado (Conase) wrote in message

I don't think you can do it in your kitchen or garage and make it look nice. I'll get a new sink with holes already cut. But that's me.
Yaofeng
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actually with the "greenlee punch" you can! that IS how it is done!

2nd option
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look
I've always used a carbide tipped hole saw with a pilot bit.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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I cut one for a water filter a couple years ago with a hole saw. It was surprisingly quick and easy.
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Ya, get a good hole saw. Keep it cool with some light and remember the harder the material the slower the speed and you will not have any problem. Make a small pilot hole first.
I cut one for a water filter a couple years ago with a hole saw. It was surprisingly quick and easy.
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until the hole saw reaches the other side and wants to rip your arm out of socket. USE A "GREENLEE PUNCH"
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out of

By the time you get the punch together I'll have the hole done.
And I've never had any tugs on my arm, even though I use a 40 year old Craftsman 1/2 hp drill.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Ya! but by the time you are done filing the burrs off I would have the sink installed and water on so you could test the quality.

you my friend............................ are full of shit! there is NO way you can drill through SS without a kick on the drill. go back to testing water!
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He's using a 40 year old 1/2" Craftsman drill. That probably means a big aluminum case, a D handle, a motor that runs slow and low and would probably start your car in a pinch. I have a 50 year old B&D like that. I drive lag bolts with it and don't worry. It would not kick, because it weighs to darn much to move based on what happens at the bit.
IT would be quite different with my plastic case 1/2" (insert brand) bought in the last 20 or 30 years.
Bob
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Either way works, hole or knock-out (GreenLee) Use an 1/8'' drill bit to pilot the holesaw bit, drill slowly and lighten up on the pressure when you are almost all the way through or you will twist your wrist depending how powerful of a drill you use. If you use the knock-out, drill the hole for bolt 3 to 4 sizes over the diameter of the bolt, Otherwise the piece from the hole will "crimp" around the threads and strip the threads.
On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 10:37:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@lflslfl.com wrote:

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must have been a cheap one from H.D. (24 gauge)
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On 20 Aug 2003 04:45:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.commado (Conase) wrote:

A cheap hole saw set will do it in a pinch. To get a clean hole with even edges, back up the metal with some scrap wood (MDF, pine, etc). Clamp or brace the scrap wood so that it is tightly held to the metal. Lightly oil the metal and saw and drill at a slow speed. Take off the burr with 150-grit sandpaper. Don't know what the pros use, but the hole saw set is under $8.
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(Conase) wrote:

and
install
be
An $8.00 hole saw isn't going to cut stainless - ever - even oiled
Tom J
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Not to mention, those things are dangerous. Always buy a quality hole saw. In this case, drill a hole and use a Greenlee punch.
Bob
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To try, push as hard as you can, so the saw will still turn.
Stainless just loves to work-harden, the saw has to be cutting, otherwise it just hardens the surface for the next tooth.
Grinding off all but a few teeth may help.
However, if I was doing this, and diddn't want to mess around, but just get it done with minimal tools... Start by drilling lots of 4mm holes round the edge of the hole, inside the target diameter. Use a sharp good quality bit, and push quite hard.
Now, with tinsnips or a hacksaw blade join up all the holes.
For some things (with large bezels) you can leave it here, just run a file or something to take off the sharpest edges off, and fix on.
Do make sure this is safe to do and won't pierce washers.
However, to do it properly, finish up with an abrasive wheel on a dremel, or a drill, or at a pinch a file. Again, if using metal tools (other than carbide) on stainless, push hard so every tool takes a bite.
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otherwise
just
the
file or

dremel, or

hard so

My hole saw only has one carbide tooth.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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