Cracking grout

I recently remodelled my shower (new layout, tile, etc) in my bathroom.
http://www.rapture.org/shower/006.jpg
After having the glass put up, I noticed on the right side the grout was cracking around tiles which touched the glass. Specifically, the area you see right here:
http://www.rapture.org/shower/010.jpg
It was in a traffic area and it was bad enough where I had to bring out a professional. Before the contractor could work, I had the surrounding glass removed. The contractor didn't do a perfect job (not nearly good enough for $450), but I just want to get this over with. Anyway, now I noticed cracking on tile on the outside in a totally non-traffic area, such as this:
http://www.rapture.org/shower/001.jpg
http://www.rapture.org/shower/012.jpg (zoomed out, can't really see it in a picture)
The inside of the shower, there are no cracks on the tile grout. My question is, can I just fix this grout without having to remove the glass & tiles? For example, just scrape the grout out and put more in? I don't know what the deal is with the grout cracking, especially in areas which get no traffic like that. But I've spent way over my budget on this bathroom and I want to get it over with.
Thanks
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If the cracking came right after the glass was installed, it may be a result of the installation. Perhaps the drill they used vibrated the wall or the extra weight of the glass caused it to shift. Push it around, make sure its not going to just happen again.
Whatever the reason you can either rake out some grout and regrout or if it is not bothering you cosmetically you can smear with silicone (may want to do that for a temp fix until you get to replacing the grout). I'm thinking that scrubbing non sanded grout into the crack with a toothbrush would cover it for a while but it would open again with the slightest shifting (might be worth a try, it could work)
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It would appear that the glass has moved the tiles a bit. Are they still firmly attached, or do they move if you lift them? If there is visable movement, you probably need to re-attach them. If not, you could try re-grouting, but there has already been movement, so it may not last.
Is the wood under the tile waterproofed somehow? If not, moisture that gets through the grout may be causing wood expansion under the tile.
If the tile is solid, and grout does not last, you could use caulk which would accomodate movement.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

I don't see any glass in this photo. Rather hard to tell since your photos - especially the closeups - are way out of focus. However...
1. If by "glass" you mean the pieces of aluminum screwed to the tile in which the door fits fits then you shouldn't be using grout there. Use caulk.
2. If you are talking about areas where tile abuts wood trim then you could use either caulk or grout; however, it is likely that there will always be sme cracking if grout is used due to the difference of expansion/contraction of the two materials. Moreover, if the rim was painted before grouting (likely) the grout won't stick well to it and you'd most likely have a hairline crack at the grout/wood junction. Won't hurt anything...
--

dadiOH
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Yeah that picture was taken after the glass was removed and the tile/grout fixed -- but before the glass was reinstalled.
Actually, the glass installers were here this morning and based off of comments I had here, I had the glass reinstalled instead of the the rest removed. I will fix the grout with the glass installed. The glass is very thick and super heavy so it probably is caused by the weight or something.
In any case, I do have another somewhat related question.
Is it normal for grout to have air holes? It is not /everywhere/ but there are several places which have air holes in the grout. For example:
http://www.rapture.org/shower/013.jpg
http://www.rapture.org/shower/014.jpg
http://www.rapture.org/shower/015.jpg
Is this normal or should I be covering the holes up with more grout? The grout is well sealed, but I don't know how far back those holes go...
Thanks for all the comments!

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Just seconding the comment above to the effect that where different materials (including what's *behind* the tile) meet, or even were similar materials are subject to differing change in temperature, unless you can provide some sort of mechanical expansion joint caulk is more durable that grout.
For this reason grout manufacturers make special color-matched caulks to match their grouts, available in both "sanded" and "non-sanded" forms to match grout texture, and custom mixed colors are also available.
In my experience the caulk to grout color/texture match is seldom exact, but it's been my observation, confirmed in conversation with experienced tile setters and contractors, that there are just some applications (such as joints between floor tiles and cove tiles or were corners meet at an exterior wall) were grout frequently fails, and that in these locations the best choice is to caulk with the understanding that ever decade or so you may need to do so again - at least the old caulk is easier to remove than grout.
FWIW, I've found Michael Byrn's "Setting Tile"
http://tinyurl.com/fwt94
(Amazon.com product link shortened)52639878/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-4126620-4387934?s=books&v=glance&n(3155
to be an excellent resource on such questions.
He's a bit "old fashioned" is some of his techniques, but he got his start working for a company that repaired work done by others, so he's very aware of a number of potential tiling "pitfalls' that many not become apparent for months or even years after initial installation, and the book has hundreds of photographs and illustrators that clearly convey his approach to preventing such problems.
Michael Thomas Paragon Home Inspections, LLC Chicago, IL mdtATparagoninspectsDOTcom 8four7-475-5668
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Bob wrote:

I wouldn't worry about them.
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dadiOH
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