Counter-tops: What's next after granite?

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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Think talc.
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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Are you doing it for yourself, or to please someone else? Put in what YOU like.
s
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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Hi, After granite? Crystal glass. For me laminate. Lasts long easy to replace.
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I have seen some concrete counter tops and they were very interesting because of the various coloured aggregates that were used.
Personally, I'm not at all sold on stainless steel as the surface seems to be a magnet for finger prints and seems to be a real bugger to keep looking nice.
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and the damn fridge magnets won't stick to them... ;-)
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Jim Yanik
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Now that is a good thing in my opinion.
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On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 09:08:31 -0400, "Worn Out Retread"

I have stainless steel counter tops with built-in drainboard, cerca 1940's. Works very well and lasts a long time. Of course a heavier gauge than what is made today. My next coutertop will most likely be wood, could care less whatever the fad.
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Soapstone - thousands of chemistry labs can't be wrong. Nothing stains or attacks it even acids, hot pans right from stove to counter, scratches sand out. We just did our new house kitchen with it and after a month, can find no downside...
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It depends on your situation/family. If looking for affordability you cant beat laminates like Formica. If you are a young family with several kids then I would say use Formica until they are grown up, then update your sure-to-be-dilapidated kitchen with granite later. Three kids will do in a kitchen in about 12 years time. If you are about to prep a house for sale then go with granite. etc. etc. etc. I agree that Corian is out of fashion, stainless looks too industrial, concrete will have you looking hard for truly qulified installers. But granite is timeless, Formica is practical and cheap to replace when it goes in/out of fashion, sythetic stone commonly called "quartz" is expensive if you want granite thicknesses and probably more subject to fashion trends than granite. In my area (Chicago- land) a nicely finished granite install with fancy edges is still the gold standard.
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windcrest wrote:

Excellent summary!
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wrote:

About a year and a half ago we remodeled our kitchen. After much shopping and comparison we went with a product called Silestone. It is a composite of crushed quartz and epoxy, polished and shaped. It was quite a bit cheaper than granite and does not need to be sealed to prevent staining. In the time we have used it, we have NO scratches visible. It is available in many patterns and colors, with or without integral sink.
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wrote:

We have had Silestone (an almost white pattern with little specks, very nice on the eyes) now for some 8 years. Almost immediately there was a small spot that chipped out (about 1 square inch). It was somewhat clumsily repaired. Since we know where it is, it is visble to us, but others will not see it unless we point it out. The surface was made in 2 parts, and the seam has become a little more visible than I would have liked to. There have been no scratches on it, despite my better half using the counter as a cutting board. We have a sink that's fitted underneath. The only thing that's leaked is the Moen single handle faucet, and that was replaced for $65 total.
I would buy the same setup again if it were indicated, but would spend the extra bucks to make it in a single piece (about 1/4 of the total surface is an inch or so greater in depth, and that would have cost considerably more if made in 1 piece - in hindsight I should have done that).
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Best regards
Han
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I'm not into trends, I'm into what I like. What I like right now is Formica with ceramic tile edging and backsplash. I've had Corian along with a seamless Corian kitchen sink and basically I thought it was just plain boring. Granite has recently been suspected of causing some kind of health problems so I suspect it is in demise. Stainless steel seems like it is good for people who like to spend the whole day in the kitchen polishing their appliances and countertops and wish they lived in a science lab. This might explain why some people have coffee makers that look like they were designed by Nicola Tesla.
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Or Stovetops.
What have you heard about the health effects of granite?
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Thomas G. Marshall wrote:

Probably radon, which you may or may not get from a specific piece of granite.
Wouldn't think you would get much from the limited volume in a kitchen but I haven't seen details.
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m...

Formica
This
Or Stovetops.
What have you heard about the health effects of granite?
I don't remember exactly but I think it had to do with some kind of toxic residue from the surface of the countertops.
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granite often has residual radiation from uranium decay.
http://medheadlines.com/2008/07/26/granite-countertops-contain-radioactive - minerals/
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_Granite_toxic
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Jim Yanik
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It's a long hard run keeping up with the Jones's
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In-home food preparation will soon be a thing of the past. Once ObamaCare figures out how much sloppy hygene in residential kitchens is costing they will place a complete ban on amateur food prep. You won't need a countertop since you'll be purchasing pre-prepared food from a government operated (or licensed) establishment.
So forget those countertops and reallocate the space for something more useful.
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| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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You really should seek professional help for your paranoia.
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