Copper epoxy

A coworker was telling me about doing some DIY plumbing work and since he had no experience with soldering copper fittings, he used a product called "copper epoxy". He said it was easy to use and had no leaks when done. I never heard of it. Has anyone had any experience with it? KC
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A coworker was telling me about doing some DIY plumbing work and since he had no experience with soldering copper fittings, he used a product called "copper epoxy". He said it was easy to use and had no leaks when done. I never heard of it. Has anyone had any experience with it? KC
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KC wrote:

It's been widely available for 20 years and works very well, providing the instructions are followed exactly. The mating surfaces must be cleaned of grease and oil (alcohol is good for this), sanded thoroughly (#300-400 paper), then wiped again with alcohol. Mix 50% epoxy and 50% hardener and stir them very thoroughly, at least 60 seconds, or it may never cure (this is a problem with epoxies designed to cure in 30 minutes or less). Apply the epoxy thoroughly to both the outside of the pipe (thick layer) and the inside of the joint fitting (thin layer), and slightly twist the two after insertion. Wait at least 30 minutes, at which time the epoxy should be rock-hard, although much more time may be needed if the temperature is below 50-60F (mild heat, such as from a lamp, can help greatly). If it remains even somewhat soft, i.e., you can dent it at all with a fingernail, it wasn't mixed right, and the joint has to be heated to melt the epoxy so it can be completely removed and the whole application done over.
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do_not_spam snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote: ...

Soldering sounds simpler by far... :)
--
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2008 12:20:11 -0800 (PST), do_not_spam snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

something like that.
No mixing, but the clean, sand, and clean routine is the same.
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KC wrote:

Yep, it was discussed in another thread.
http://superglue.supergluecorp.com/copperbond.html
TDD
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wrote:

I've used it, with mixed results. I don't like it - I don't trust it. Lead solder is the easiest to use - the lead-free crap doesn't flow worth a hoot, but I'll solder all my copper joints rather than using the "glue".
Main thing when soldering? Use a turbo torch on Mapp gas or an acetelene torch. A standard propane BernzoMatic is a recipe for failure
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agree, who knows how long it will last?
Real plumbing stores do have good lead free solder that works well.

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wrote:

Lead free solder works fine as long as you use the flux that is made for it. The flux used with lead solder will not work well.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Its a small sample size but I have had two occasions (helping friends) where solder purchased from different big box places gave really poor results and that was using the same brand flux that was noted as compatible. The less expensive solder I buy at the real plumbing store flows just like 50/50 does.
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George wrote:

I have the best luck with the soldering paste that contains solder powder mixed with flux. With a cleaned pipe, I get a perfect joint every time. The big box stores carry the stuff. Oatey Water Soluble Tinning Flux 53068
TDD
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KC wrote:

A lot of people forget that just because whatever it is works when it is first done doesn't mean much. What about 5 or 10 or 20 years down the road? Who knows how dependable the stuff is.
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Yeah, that's the reason I was asking. Apparently it came on the market about 10 years ago and several people reported it was great. I'd like to hear from those same people now to see how it held up over time. Soldering is the preferred way of making a connection, but in reworking old plumbing you sometimes run into cases where you can't get a joint made with a torch. If the epoxy works, it'd sure make things easier. KC
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KC wrote: ...

What case(s) would those be?
--
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KC wrote:

I have never encountered that. If you are working close to wood there are blankets and other methods you can use to protect the wood.
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George wrote:

According to the scorch marks and melted cables I've seen, including cables inside metal conduit, some plumbers haven't heard of heat shields
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George wrote:

It has held up well even after 20 years, but I was told if it was applied to oily pipes, the defect could go undetected for up to several months.
Epoxy for copper pipes isn't some new-fangled invention that will turn into a disaster. It has a good track record.
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