Converting a Real stucco with stacked stone to a brick front

We found a house that we really liked last week and it matches our criteria. There a couple of questionable things about this house.
This house has a real stucco with stacked stone front and concreted siding on the sides and back. This house is built in 1997 by Ryland homes in Atlanta, Georgia, well maintained interior and exterior and looks impeccable.
I like brick fronts and my agent told me that he does not even list stucco houses in general.
I heard from a friend that because the house is real stucco, we can pay a contractor to make this to brick front. Is this a good idea ?
Is it common to convert a real stucco to a brick front ?.
Does it effect the resale value of the house ?
What is a rough ball park number for converting?
Please please help.
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As apposed to fake stucco??? I am lost why do you want to remove the skin of a new home? If it is for looks you going to spend a lot of money that you probably will never get back. Your talking about removing the outer sheath of your home. I own a Richmond-American home that is built the same way. It will be expensive and you had better be talking to the inspectors about this.
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FIrst of all there is real old fashion stucco and there is synthetic stucco. The latter is a problem because it may trap humidity in the walls and eventually the structure rots out. It has been outlawed in many areas and has dragged down the value of real stucco homes even though there is nothing wrong with real stucco.
Brick requires a footing. Stucco does not. So there is no footing there except where the stacked stone is assuming it is real and not a veneer.
Bricking up a house is a major deal and quite frankly, you don't sound like you know enuf about houses to get involved unless you can find a top notch contractor which is rare. Most brick houses are not flashed correctly and the brick is not tied to the framing correctly. In your case, how can the brick be tied to the framing since the framing studs are no longer visible thru the exisiting siding. You are asking for trouble but if you want to pursue it visit the Brick Industry Association site and read their technical notes about installing brick. There's a lot more to it then you (and most contractors) know.

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Thanks for your advise. I am a first time buyer. I will try and look for the house with the brick front instead of doing custom work. You guys helped me make the decision. Thanks for your help.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (raiden) wrote in message

First, although I think SQLit & Art suggest some real problems you would face, I think the level of panic suggested is a bit much.
Second, there is not enough information to suggest a cost.
As an architect, I dislike "brick fronts". I think they make houses look cheap, because it looks like a false front.
Ask your realtor about the resale value. Your friend's comment as you render it, doesn't make much sense. Is your friend assuming that since stucco is sort of like masonry, it's sort of like brick?
The stone, if it has some thickness / depth, would suggest the existence of a ledge in the foundation to support brick. The brick should be part of a cavity wall with an air space behind the brick. The brick above door and window openings would have to be supported on lintels. Flashing and weep holes would be required above and below window openings, and at the base of the wall. The brick would have to be tied back to the structural wall at intervals of two feet or so. Trim at openings would have to be designed and installed to deal with the thickness of the brick and air space.
As SQLit and Art point out, adding brick would be difficult and so expensive. If it were me, and the house layout, condition, and neighborhood are acceptable, I'd buy, then work out the details and costs over the next year. The choice of brick can make a big difference in the cost, so give time for that search.
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As some one in the construction business of sorts (an architect) I wanted to give you something to consider.
As I'm sure you know, brick is supposed to be tied to the studs of a house. After they frame a house and put up the sheathing, they usually (at least in my area) cover the house with tyvac or some other brand paper.
Have you ever seen them mark the position of the studs as they put up the paper? I've never seen it once. Never. So how the heck can the masons be putting the brick ties into the studs. Answer..... they don't unless they randomly hit one once in a while. Basically all these brick veneered houses are not being built properly and its a crime, in my opinion.
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I don't think it's supposed to be tied into the actual studs - they usually just nail the ties to the sheathing. Whe weight of the bricks is supposed to be carried by the foundation lip.
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Supposed to be in the studs.
http://www.bia.org /
See the many technical notes. Note also that the corrugated ties used almost all the time on residential jobs are not recommended.

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