Conversion Oil fired boiler to Electric boiler

Living in Quebec which supposedly has the cheapest hydro rates in North America I'm considering changing from an old oil fired boiler to an electric boiler. I have a relatively small house and the much smaller boiler unit, no more oil tank, cleanliness and apparently faster heating time really appeals me. Anyone have thoughts on this? Thanks in advance
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Run the cost comparisons. If oil is 2.40 a gallon, electric would have to be down to about .075 per kWh to give the same Btu at the same cost. Remember, oil is about 75% to 80% efficient. This web site uses 78% http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/fuel_cost_comparison_calculator/
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On Wed, 16 May 2007 07:23:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

Pretty much a no brainer isn't it?
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wrote:

Not from the numbers I've seen. At 2.40 a gallon for oil, electric has to be 7.5 to break even. Removing and replacing the heating system and electric service upgrade will cost $3000 to $5000? At 5 a kWh, the payback will probably be 10 years. OK, I agree, it is a no brainer. Leave it alone.
Another possibility is to add some electric baseboard heaters and leave the oil system in place. If the difference between the fuels changes, so does the use.
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On Wed, 16 May 2007 15:02:38 +0000, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Exactly.
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Thanks for the fast replies. My present oil furnace is kaput so I have about the same replacement costs whether oil or electric anyway. No gas in my area of Montreal. Another thing about switching to electric is we don't have the big fluctuations in prices that oil does. FWIW I see oil prices rising a lot faster than electricity prices.
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Helps if you supply more complete information early on.
Trust your own judgement.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Faster heating time with an electric boiler than with oil? No way.
Any faster heating that you might see is due *solely* to the "smaller boiler unit". Older units were frequently oversized. Compare heating times on electric and oil units of the same size.

Considered natural gas?
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Unless you have a big enough hydro service now, don't forget to include an upgrade to probably a 200 amp. supply in your cost calculations. An indoor/outdoor reset controller would also save on operating costs.
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What's an indoor/outdoor reset controller?? I know there's an optional outdoor sensor on some models that heats the water temperature relative to the outside temperature -dunno if that's what you're referring to. Yes have the entrance upgrade factored in. (about $1400 Cdn)
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"In hydronic heating systems -- also known as hot-water systems -- a single-stage reset control device can sense changes in outdoor temperature and adjust the temperature of the hot water that circulates through the system. The result increases the efficiency of the boiler without sacrificing comfort.
These control devices, also called indoor-outdoor reset controls, cost from about $500 installed, and studies show that they can reduce annual fuel costs anywhere from 5 to about 25 percent. The most common range of savings, however, is in the 12 to 15 percent range."
Reset controls have been popular in Europe, which has experienced high fuel costs for more than 30 years. The technology has been common in commercial heating in the United States for nearly as long. With the cost of home heating fuel skyrocketing, these controls are becoming more popular in residential applications.
"They're excellent," says Ed Schoen of Prestige Heating Service Inc. in Massapequa. "Most of the time, I find people are buying them with the installation of a new boiler. ...Really, the control is part of an energy-efficient package, which includes everything from a high-efficiency boiler and a digital, programmable thermostat to a well-insulated home."
Richard Levi, part owner of Comfort Specialists in Oceanside, also is a fan of the indoor-outdoor reset controls. "In a new boiler installation, it's a no- brainer," Levi says. "Oil and gas, the prices are not going down, and over the long haul this saves on fuel."
Levi, however, says recent technology is the reason the controls are beginning to make a dent in the residential market. "Years ago, these controls were not very reliable because they were made of big boxes with mechanical relays that broke down frequently," he says. For the past 10 years, Comfort Specialists has been installing reset controls for commercial heating systems. "I've never had one go bad on me yet," Levi says.
The reset control devices are manufactured by companies such as Tekmar Controls, Honeywell and Johnson Controls. Here's how they work:
The size of a heating system is calculated, in part, based on the coldest day of the year in a given climate. "Since every day is not the coldest day of the year, a heating system often is running 'oversized' and inefficiently," says Don Rathe, owner of Rathe Associates Inc., a Syosset company that distributes heating and cooling components, including reset controls by Tekmar.
So whether the thermostat is set at 68 degrees or 78 degrees, a hydronic heating system circulates water at a maximum temperature of between 180 degrees and 190 degrees. In mild or moderate temperatures, this output is excessive. The boiler heats and circulates water to the hottest temperature, even though there isn't a maximum demand for heat.
With a reset device installed, an air sensor mounted on the exterior of the north side of the building (commonly the coldest part of the exterior) senses any change in outside air temperature. The air sensor communicates this outside temperature change to a control box mounted on the boiler. Another sensor is installed on the pipe that supplies water to the boiler. The control box is programmed to heat the water that circulates through the boiler based on the outside temperature. So on a 40-degree day, water might be circulated at 150 degrees instead of 180 degrees or 190 degrees.
"The boiler doesn't have to work as hard to heat the water, so there's a savings in fuel," Rathe says. "The thermostat remains the brains of the heating system, but the reset control provides more support-that's the perfect word - for the thermostat and the system to work more efficiently."
Although the control box is factory programmed, it also can be re-programmed to a homeowner's comfort and demands, Rathe says.
Levi says the bigger the heating system, the better the savings. "Systems with large quantities of water, bigger homes, offices and apartment complexes, this is where you see the most benefit," Levi says. "On a smaller system, you get savings, but I think you also get a lot more comfort. You don't have these bursts of heat coming at you and then have the system shutting down.
"There's a more consistent output of heat."
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you will likely need 400 amps for whhole use heating, price sounds low
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Ladykins had written this in response to http://www.www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Conversion-Oil-fired-boiler-to-Electric-boiler-217798-.htm : Hi can anybody help me? I have lived at my house for 3 years and have a behind the wall old fashioned boiler in the dining room, like a lot of terraced houses! - it is a LANDIS & GYR controlled timer system. It has always worked fine but today I switched the heating on (constant) and behind the wall seemed to be making a loud noise and the flames were visible and burning quite ferociously
If anyone knows what this problem is or might be, please contact me . I have turned my heating for the radiators and water off
Thanks
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