constant hot water


a friend of mine was telling me that there is a new product that keeps constant hot water in your house. instead of a typical (bulky) hot water heater, this new small product takes it's place. i don't have a clue what it's called. does anyone have any info on this? a web site?
thank you
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WHoME? wrote:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&q=%22tankless+water+heaters%22
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Tankless dont keep hot water they are on demand heaters and wont run out. Electric for most is double the price of gas. Look into a Bosch Aquastar. A recirculator pump will keep hot water in pipes, but you waiste energy.
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sorry about the HTML..... i hope i fixed it.
i'm also wondering if the cost is that considerably different? (as far as a monthly billing on your energy goes).
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WHoME? wrote:

It shouldn't be considerably different.
It takes 1 British Thermal Unit (BTU) to raise 1lb of water 1 degree F. Whether you heat it all at the same time (tank) or continuously (tankless) doesn't matter in terms of energy consumed. Obviously a tank heater will have some storage loss, but I wouldn't expect that to be "considerable" from an energy use point of view.
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if i want one for my master bedroom , where would i install it? i don't have a clue where and how they are installed.. are they simpe to install?
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WHoME? wrote:

If you want to just do your master bath, then you could go with a point of use model. These are available in electric models. I just put one in a full bath (shower & sink). I installed it in the vanity cabinet. The unit was about $200 and it required cutting into the wall and reworking the plumbing. I had to bring a 220 volt line in also. Took about a day to do everything.
I got the unit from Niagara. Here is their website:
http://www.tanklesswaterheater.com /
I installed a 220 volt unit, but they have 120 volt units also.
As a test, I turned the shower on full hot and left it running for an hour and a half. It produced very hot water for the entire time. I turned the unit down a notch because it was a little on the TOO hot side.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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actually one of the biggest losses isnt through the tank at all. its through the pipes going into it, particularly the cold water pipe. you can check this yourself. go feel the inlet pipe right next to the heater and move your hand away. it gets colder. while its somewhat intuitive to insulate the hot water line, you should insulate 5' of the cold water inlet pipe as well.
randy

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Tanks loose efficiency from day 1 with scale buildup, Tankless dont and last 2-3 times longer. I removed a 5 yr old electric , high insulated Rheem with a blanket and reduced bills from 30 electric to 6 in gas. Considering electric to be double the cost of gas I still lowered my bill 50% + . My payback on the Bosch is 3 yrs. Apx 1/3 of gas used is for water heating, that is alot of gas , a cost I view as money going down the drain. Gas tankless are better than ever, they have been standard in most countries for over 20 years they are a true quality alternative we are only now leaning about. Bosch and Takagi make units for most any home and are quality. They even have units that require no electricity for ignition, one uses batteries, 2 D cells, mine are 2.5 yrs old and just tested with maybe 2 yrs left. And one with a mini Hydro generator and remote upstairs thermostat. They are really worth considering.
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Not only is pipe standby loss great but the flue loss may be greater as to its larger diameter and air convection to the outdoors, it is also an uninsulated area. Tankless win on this area again.
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yup. next time im going tankless.
randy

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wrote:

Yes, thanks :>

I don't know. It's an old system that was here when I moved in. I'd have to factor in that my hot water system is oil and the rest of my energy use is electric (and a small amount of gas for stove and dryer). My guess would be that in the winter when the furnace is on, the hot water production would be really cheap, whereas in the summer I'd have to balance keeping the furnace on vs. the cost of running a dehumidifier in the basement.
Oh, another advantage of the instant on- since I have an interior oil tank it saves me space in the basement by not having yet another tank! OTOH, a disadvantage, at least with mine, is that it takes some fiddling to get the water temperature correct. Mine works by mixing hot (HOT! SCALDING! REALLY, REALLY HOT!) water from the boiler with cold water. When I moved in the faucets were putting out 190+ water... I had to go back and forth a bit with the mixing valve to get it to 130-ish. I imagine that with a stand-alone system you wouldn't have that problem.
My system is installed in the basement and produces hot water for the whole house.
Sue(tm) Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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