Connecting Ground wire with a Split Bolt

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On Sat, 14 Nov 2015 07:57:51 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

You are right. He clarified his post to say the neutral and ground were split in the house panel and in that case the ground wire should go straight from the ground bus in the panel to the neutral/ground bus in the main disconnect enclosure where the main bonding jumper resides. Up until 99 or 02 it was legal to feed panels in separate buildings with 3 wire and create a new neutral ground bonding jumper there.
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2015 15:30:38 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

Ground loops are not the issue and nothing on the line side of a GFCI should trip it. The issue with "regrounding the neutral" is you are going to impose some current on the grounding conductor and the voltage will rise in reference to ground level. This will be mitigated when you actually create another ground reference in the sub panel in a second building but then you are really not using a separate ground at all. They still see it as "Objectionable current on the grounding conductor" so you do not connect at both ends and in the case of the line side (power company service conductors), you don't have a grounding conductor at all (just 3 wires)
For most of the life of the NEC they treated a second building as a separate service in regard to the grounding but they chipped away at that idea until it disappeared. Now it is just like a sub panel inside the same building, 4 wire feeder and an isolated neutral. They just kept the ground rod requirement to create a fresh ground reference for the equipment grounding bus bar.
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