Concrete fastners WITHOUT using a hammer drill

Hey guys,
Sorry for the seemingly dumb question, but I need to attach some PVC conduit to my foundation using conduit clips. Problem is that I don't have a hammer drill, so I wanted to know if there is any kind of fastener I can use instead that doesn't require a hammer drill but will hold on the concrete outdoors?
If I'm smoking dope, just lemme know and I'll find someone who has a hammer drill.... but I figure there must be something out there.
Thanks,
G
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wrote:

:-)
What is the diff between hammer drills and rotary hammers???
I have a hammer drill, myself.
i

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Ignoramus11219 wrote:

As nearly as I can tell, a drill just turns, a drill hammer can be set to turn and hammer or just turn, and a rotohammer is a heavy duty version of a drill hammer that only hammers and turns - no "turn only" option.
Now someone is going to check in and tell me about their Binford Roto-Hammer 9000 that has nine horsepower and a no-hammer option. :)
As far as the original post, either a power load nailer or a concrete bit in a regular drill and inserts, as someone else suggested, would probably do the trick.
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snipped-for-privacy@surewest.net (James Gifford) writes:

Pretty much. A rotohammer has a splined bit that can't slip, and is heavy duty enough that you can core a 2" hole through a concrete wall. That is the electric version. You can get bigger with air tools. I have run an air drill that was the same size as a 90 lb. jack hammer, except it turned the bit. The bit was a large (1.5"?) star bit with an air channel in the center to blow the chips out of the hole. Even bigger than that is an air track, that they use for drilling rock for setting explosive charges for quarries.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc

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A hammerdrill is useful for drilling smaller ( <1/2") holes in concrete, brick, or masonry. The chuck (& bit) move back and forth many times per minute. You can use regular bits or masonry bits. Most also will operate in "drill only" mode to increase the usefullness of the tool. These work much better than a normal drill for concrete.
A rotohammer is a different beast altogether. The special (SDS+, spline, SDS max) bit is turned by means of splines on it. The tool has a mechanism that hammers directly on the bit itself. The beats per minute are fewer than a typical hammerdrill, but far more energetic. Rotary hammers can sometimes include "rotation only" and "hammer only" modes to increase the versatility of the tool. These tools are for serious concrete drilling and will drill 1-2" holes through hard, aged concrete. With a core bit, they can drill a 3+" diameter hole through a foundation wall to bring in underground services.
Jeff Dantzler
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Thanks for your excellent summary Jeff.
i
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Why not just use a concrete bit in your power drill and then use plastic or lead inserts to hold the screws? Muff

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YES!!
You don't need a hammer drill to make holes in concrete, just a regular drill, a cheap carbide bit (which may not survive) and patience. Use Tapcon screws--they rock!

concrete
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get a box of tapcons the ones that include the concrete bit
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I see the advice on here that you need a hammer drill to drill holes in a foundation. This is total bunk. I have drilled dozens of holes in concrete, cinderblock and brick with regular drills- both corded and cordless. Sure a hammer drill makes faster work of the project, but if you are doing a one-off project, drilling no more than 15 or 20 holes, you will be just fine with a couple of masonry bits and a regular drill (preferably corded).
I prefer Tapcon screws for this application- they screw directly into masonry with no anchors and really hold tight.

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I second this experience. Drilling in conrete or brick is difficult. Hammer drilling is much easier although it is not entirely trivial.
i

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quoting:

concrete outdoors?

Try it with a regular drill. If it seems slow, then rent a hammer drill for the day.
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Actually, your advice is total bunk- to use your genteel vernacular. Much of the aggregate in concrete will simply not be drilled with carbide bit. Hammer-drilled- no problem. Not to mention that it's _much_ simpler to put hole where desired with hammer-drill.
Get your facts straight before getting obnoxious, if I may suggest.
HTH, John
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On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 19:07:59 GMT, "G. Filicetti"

You don't need a hammer drill...all you need is a masonry bit.
But you'll get each hole done about 75% faster with a hammer drill. And they're cheap now...some under $20.
But a regular FAST drill will do the job. Don't try it with a 500 rpm drill.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Help keep down the world population...have your partner spayed or neutered.
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