CO Detectors - A/C with line cord and digital display?

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Here in NYC we are expected to have Carbon Monoxide detectors installed by November 1st. They are supposed to be 15' from all bedrooms. I'd also like to install one in the cellar near the furnace. One with a digital read out. I'd like one that plugs in, but uses a line cord. The outlets in the cellar are on electrical boxes being fed by conduit. But I can easily mount one somewhere on the brick wall and plug in. But the only one I've found with a line cord was a simple one without a read out.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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Don Wiss wrote:

red LED readout and an audible signal. Got it at HD. Here is the Nighthawk web site. The model shown is a newer design than mine. Mine doesn't have battery backup. http://www.mwenergy.com/nighthawk.html
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I don't see any line cord.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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Don Wiss wrote:

Why would it have a battery backup then?

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Because it is 110 volts, but like most of them plugs directly into the outlet without a cord.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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Don Wiss wrote:

From the HD site -specifications Features include a 3-way mounting option: plug directly into AC receptacle, mount on a tabletop using supplied 8-ft. power cord, or wall-mount. Digital readout continuously displays carbon monoxide levels from 30-999 parts per million. The display reads "Gas" when explosive gas reaches dangerous level. The loud 85 dB alarm sounds when CO and/or explosive gas reaches dangerous levels. This unit has a permanent sensor that never needs replacement. Another feature is the peak-level memory which means the unit will recall the highest level of CO present since previous reset. 5-year limited warranty.

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Okay. I wonder where the prongs go when wall mounted? I'm heading down to Home Depot now to see what they have. Locally all CO detectors are sold out. It wouldn't surprise me if HD is also. But I need some flower bulbs, so my trip won't be wasted.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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Don Wiss wrote:

on the back to hang on a screw or nail in the wall. Mine cannot stand on a table or shell, since the cord comes out of the bottom.
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willshak wrote:

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Don Wiss wrote:

on the back to hang on a screw or nail in the wall. Mine cannot stand on a table or shelf, since the cord comes out of the bottom.
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Nighthawk, and for the basement they have a model that also has a natural gas detector Co detector in one unit, with digital display. The plug in, with cord, Co digital read out has been available for years and has battery backup
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On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 12:29:57 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Sounds good. But I was unable to find it on the web.
Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
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Remember one thing about CO detectors, they read what is specified by CPSC. That level of read out is unacceptable.
The best CO detectors ( and the ones I have in my house are here. www.coexperts.com
FWIW, Here is the info off of a line card.
Desirable level 0 PPM Acceptable level of CO in any living space 9 PPM Max Concentration for continuous exposure in any 8 hr. period 50 PPM Frontal headaches 1 to 2 hrs, life threatening after 3 hours 400 PPM Nausea and convulsions, death within 2 hours 800 PPM Nausea within 20 minutes, death within 1 hour 1600 PPM Death with in 1-3 minutes 12,800 PPM
I got this info from Bacharach, Inc., makers of test instruments. They do have a website, http://www.bacharach-inc.com /

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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.yahoo.com says...

How so? CO detectors are designed to detect CO released from malfunctioning combustion appliances. Pretty much any CO detector out there will accomplish this job just fine.
If you're truly paranoid and want to have protection against even really low levels of CO, then spend your money and buy one of the highly- overpriced "low level" detectors. Chances are you'll quit using it when it keeps alarming for no good reason.
The best defence against carbon monoxide poisoning is ensuring that your furnace, gas fireplace, and any other combustion appliances are in good working order and inspected professionally once per year. Carbon monoxide detectors are simply a backup in case something goes wrong (in which case, the alarm thresholds will be easily passed).
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Fine. I'll read about you and your family in the obituary's...
Mine has only gone off once and that was not a false alarm. Believe me, my systems are top notch tuned up.
says...

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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.yahoo.com says...

If the CO levels in my home get high enough to cause death, my CO detectors will most definitely trigger (as will pretty much all CO detectors out there).
The "low level" detectors mentioned will catch very low level exposure to CO, which may cause health problems, but most certainly won't cause death.
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says...

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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.yahoo.com says...

So, what's your point? Smoke detectors _don't_ always go off when they should. No 'detector' will ever work perfectly.
For the same money, you can buy five or six "regular" CO detectors for the price of one "low level detection" detector. I'd think the former would provide more protection against life-threatening levels of CO, with a far lower chance of not alarming when needed.
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It's your life.
I will not toy with the lives of my kids. If you remember the chart I copied, it said 0 PPM was Desirable. That's what I strive for in my house.
says...

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Ann Onymous wrote:

I don't think that is so. We had one (I can't recall the brand but it was one of the companies that makes smoke detectors) that went off. We rushed outside and called the fire department; they came quickly and impressively, with all kinds of equipment, and found there was no CO. They suggested I get a Nighthawk as they felt it was the best consumer level alarm made. We have had our Nighthawk for many years now and it has performed flawlessly.
I know there is an argument that the one I had that went off erroneously probably would have gone off had there been a dangerous level of CO, but I think a detector that goes off erroneously is more likely to be ignored when there is a true danger.
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