CO Detected

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We decided to buy a CO detector "just because" So, we mounted it about 8 inches below the ceiling on the 2nd floor hallway I checked it tonight and it shows a peak reading of 14. I am very surprised to say the least. I have gas heat,dryer and HW and a fireplace thats gas but isnt used very often although it has a pilot. Where do you suppose the CO is coming from? Is 14 ppm anything to worry about? Is that just the sensor fluctuating? What should i make of all this? Thanks Eric
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I am Locutus of Borg.
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read co detector instructions
contact co detecter manufacturer
contact local fire department
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Definitely read the instructions. CO is heavier than air. The detector should be mounted near the floor, not near the ceiling. You may have higher concentrations of CO than you think.

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Wayne, You Freakin Idiot. Stop blurting out stupid untrue shit. Try researching before you spout. Read man, Read! http://home.att.net/~cobusters1 / Bubba
On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 05:39:04 -0600, "Wayne"

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Bubba wrote:

It's not exactly "untrue."
First, don't take as gospel data from some person's internet home page. Not too many people have an electrical outlet ten inches from the wall anyway.
Second, in the real world, I submit it doesn't matter where the detector is mounted. Presumably, the detector exists because of concerns regarding a heating device. The presence of a heating device implies convection currents.
Warm CO is definitely lighter than cold CO. But that which was warm will cool, that which was cool will become warm, that which was broken will be made whole; the exact same molecule of CO will move up and down and eventually find the detector.
For best results, hang the detector around your neck.
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JerryMouse wrote:

Personal Experience:
About 30 people in the a vacation building with a furnace and a fireplace being used at the same time (the fireplace had the stronger draft). Some people went to sleep (on the floor with sleeping bags). Others were sitting up playing cards late at night. One of the card players got up and passed out. A couple of others did likewise. Someone went for the phone and a couple of others figured out what was going on and opened doors and windows. I was sleeping on the floor. Everyone sitting up was effected, no one on the floor had any serious effects a few ended up with head aches. I had no ill effects. Everyone was evaluated by the emergency crew. The fire department said that was the usual situation. Those higher up would be hit first.

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wrote:

You know, I dont even know how to address this one. If you want to play god and change the laws of physics, be my guest. CO is lighter than air, PERIOD! You can slice it, dice it, warm it and cool it. It is still lighter than air. Other than that, Im not going to argue with you. Believe what you want. I'll stick with proven facts. Bubba
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"At freezing temperatures, carbon monoxide is heavier than air. " See http://www.bacharach-training.com/cozone/costandardsandguidelines1.htm
Also Carbon Monoxide is heavier than oxygen.
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wrote:

So if we all sleep outside at night on the ground by a highway full or cars and trucks passing by, we have got something to worry about. Likewise, if we can all find an environment full of pure oxygen and nothing else we are in big big trouble. I guess when I ride out on that comet to another galaxy I had better take my carbon monoxide detector with me. Bubba
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Fred Dingo wrote:

However according to your reference. "Carbon monoxide has a natural tendency to rise in temperatures normally found inside buildings. At freezing temperatures, carbon monoxide is heavier than air. "
Therefor at temperatures that are within the the normal operating temperature of the sensors (If I recall correctly the operating temperature for my CO alarm is above freezing) CO is lighter than air.
According to my sources at 32
Air = 1.0000 CO = 0.9736 O = 1.113
Even at freezing it is lighter.
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Bubba wrote:

That's why many come to this newsgroup: to learn.

Nope. Density is a function of pressure and temperature. For example, solid CO2 (dry ice) is way heavier than air. Likewise solid CO. In a room, the molecules of CO (or of the cat, for that matter) become warmer and colder as time passes and they move around (see "Entropy"). You can prove this for yourself. Stick your finger in the fire: Ow, HOT! Quick, stick your finger in a jar of mayonnaise. Ah, cool! Can you write C-O-O-L on the mirror? Tommorrow, we'll discuss things you can do with mayonnaise and a rubber-band.

Trust me on this: proof does not lie in the bottom of a CrackerJack box.

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wrote:

Well, its nice to know there are still those wearing that tin foil hat. :-) Bubba
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wrote:

Thanks, I think everyone was about to jump on that answer of his.
later,

tom @ www.FindMeShelter.com
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Ouch! Mea culpa.
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Yes Bubaa , bottom line, you post like what you are, a a 9 yr old imature child. Merry Christmas
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On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 19:08:42 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

So you're telling us then that you cant even follow along with 9 yr old mentality? Once again, it must suck to be you. You'll never learn with your mouth wide open. Bubba
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This is Turtle.
the fellow with the CO staying on the floor lives on the other side of the earth from America like China and down is up and up is down. CO goes down in China and up in American. I think that is why we have trouble understanding them for they are always backwards from us.
TURTLE
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Wayne wrote:

Wrong.

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Joseph Meehan

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On which planet? :-)
Nick
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Yes it is serious to find the cause. It should read 0. Reset unit to zero so zero at peak level is shown. See if it sets to a higher level with the heating system on for a basic indication. Or is excessive cooking causing it. 14 shows a likely malfunction of a gas apliance. It could be many things, blocked chimney, no chimney draw, cracked heat exchanger on a furnace and more. You dont say if you have forced air heat. My neighbor was having headaches for a month I brought over my Co meter it registered 15ppm., her repair pro found all sections of her furnace had splits releasing Co. She had it replaced immediatly. 14 ppm wont kill you but it could make you possibly feel sick. It could get much worse fast. 14 ppm indicates investigation is necessary. Call a heat pro today. Your fire dept or gas company may come for free imediatly to find the source. It realy is not worth waiting on this one. Move your meter to different locations and near heating equipment reseting peak level. Source readings will be much higher Co.
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