circuit dead

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We're veering off-topic here
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That seems to be a trend, on Usenet.
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Christopher A. Young
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Yup: A 'short' is strictly speaking when electricty takes a path 'shorter' than it is supposed to. Often with consequeneces. Trouble is we have so many different terms for an 'open' circuit. e.g. Break, open, disconnect (or 'dis'), bad-connection, failed contact, wire-break, cut ..... etc. etc.
And that's the interesting thing about English and all the various forms of it. it is extremely flexible and we don't mind new variations and creating new and ingenious words or expressions. Every now and then someone will complain that their lingo is getting 'Americanized' or something. But their are many parts of the world where English is spoken and used very differently.
And along with say the British flair for understatement and clever use of double meaning Americans have a skill for clever and often brief expressions which sum up a situation or thing. e.g. "All jazzed up", or maybe, these days "Pimp my ride" ...............! A Brit. might describe a major fight as say "A slight dust-up".
A bad situation may be described as "Down the toilet" or "Cannned". Or something may be "Snookered" or "Creamed".
Then each generation will have our "Cool" or "Super" or "Smashing. And of course SNAFU. WWII.
There was a situation in WWII after the USA entered after Pearl Harbour, where the British had to advise their military 'From now on the term US shall be applied, respectfully, to the forces and/or members of our allies the United States'! Previously the term US had been used for Unserviceable or even Useless. International incident averted; maybe!
Along with regional words; here for example, an untrustworthy person is a 'Sleveen" (Slee-vene). Probably old Irish; "Make sure you get paid right away they are a right bunch of sleveens". Or exaggeration; "A wonder bad day" or "The perfect storm"
This ability and willingness is unlike some (e.g. The French who are concerned about the 'purity' of their language). English dictionaries for what might be called the 'official' words are much larger; quite apart from the multitude of local and 'slang' words we use.
Especially, for example, in Quebec, Canada. Where there is even legislation about signs being in French AND some other language. Imagine, say, a Vietnamese menu restaurant that 'must' also have their sign in French and those letters 'must' be bigger than the 'secondary' language symbols!
Consequently English is at the present a predominant world language, not to the 'exclusion' of any other of course and gets a lot of it's strength and utility from it's continuing ability to change and adapt while retaining many of it's colourful (or is that colorful?) words.
Ah well 'tomAtoe' or 'tomARto' or whatever; words, descriptions, etc. are great fun. Cheers.
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terry wrote:

Words and languages continue to change and evolve. Your first word, "Yup", is only about 100 years old.
http://www.word-detective.com/092906B.html
"The story of "yup" is a short one. "Yup" is simply an informal or dialectical variant of "yes." The only surprising thing about "yup" is that it apparently isn't older than it is. The earliest occurrence of "yup" in print found so far dates only to 1906, although it may have been in use orally for quite a while before then."
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wrote:

"yup" is fine, but there's a problem with "yo". It's supposed to mean yes but sounds a lot more like no.
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wrote:

Well there's Yo and there's Yo Yo Then there's Yo Yo Yo
Each individually has its place. For example:
http://i33.tinypic.com/122emmb.jpg
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Gary H wrote:

When "yo" was really big I was living about an hour outside of Philadelphia. Almost all Toyota trucks tailgates where "fixed" by removing the paint on the T,o,t,a so it just said "yo". That was after they painted them all to say "Toy".
South philly "Yo" is like talking to "Rocky". Originally meaning "Hey You"
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terry wrote:
in

Around here we have the well known Ebonics dialect but we also have the Hillbonics dialect spoken by my Hillbilly kin through- out the Appalachia region.
TDD
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Red Green wrote:

Around here it's often not the police, it's "The Law".
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Red Green wrote:

Yes, that's actually a lot more like it! There are a lot of "Ho's" here too! Look at that sheet rock, it's got a ho here, and there. Damn even my shirt has a ho in it. There is also some magical power where locals can turn people into toads! Run out of gasoline and they might say "I toad you!" Seems every time I'm wrong about something they "toad" me. Isn't it bad enough that I made a mistake? Do they really have to Toad me also?
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http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/kicked+out
verifies the common usage but not the origin
cheers Bob
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Got me puzzled. When I worked at McDonalds, people would ask for an "order" of fries. Same deal, no clue where that term started.
I wonder if that information is on the net some where?
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

That one is easy- dates from the greasy spoon diner days. Remember those little green pads the waitress (yeah, they used to serve you at the table) wrote your order on? And the big silver wheel thing hung in the pass-through behind the counter, out to the kitchen? When the scary guy out back pulled your order off the wheel, cooked it, and got done, he'd set it on the pass-through ledge and holler 'Order Up!'. Each little green slip was called an 'order'. For us techies, it is analogous to the work order taped to a dead machine.
-- aem sends...
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I was in such a place, couple years ago. The waitress would holler "order up" and the cook would put the food on the shelf, and reply "order up". Seems like one direction should be up, and other is down? Since it was just the two of them, it was less an issue.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

That was sometimes used up in eastern PA. I don't think it's used in TN, but if it was it would be "I'll have an oda of fries"

Everything is on the net somewhere.
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Wow, my question started quite the thread... I bought a new outlet and replaced what was in there. It was likely the original from the 50's (it used the screws, not a back stab). I popped in a new outlet (and also used the screws and not the backstab) and everything is now working. Everything looked okay with the old outlet, all connections appeared okay, but something must have been up. Thanks!!
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Glad you were able to switch / replace / renew / swap out the outlet. Thank you for letting us know how it worked out.
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Christopher A. Young
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Does the little guy from Star Wars (with the big ears) deliver fries? Yoda up!
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://www.word-detective.com
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

the old-style thingamajig on power poles, that when it trips, there is an actual arm that 'kicks out' beyond arc distance, to break the circuit. I've seen them in the open position, on poles in older neighborhoods, while wandering around looking at damage after a storm. Very visible from the ground.
Could be BS, but is sounds plausible.
-- aem sends...
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