Circuit breaker keeps tripping

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I am sure most would not learn about the pot rack and screw in an engineering school. Just one of the things learned by doing or hearing from another.
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 18:17:17 -0500, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I know what a potentiometer is, but not a pot rack.
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That is from someone elses post in this group.
Someone asked about why they would get shocked when they touched their stove and a rack that holds the cooking pots that is on the wall. That rack was fastened to the wall with somelag bolts and no electricity or ground to the rack.
Seems that one of the screws holding it to the wall had gone into a wire that was behind the wall. When touching that rack that was then connected to a hot wire and the stove that was acting as a gound the current would flow. Touching the stove or just the rack would not give a shock.
Something that many will not think about.
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 18:50:19 -0500, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Yikes. A screw holding a metal rack touching a hot wire. Not good.
Most of the time I hear of people getting shocked by stoves is when some homeowner wires the stove backward (if its 110VAC).
Apparently they seem to think that a neutral is the "same" as the hot wire, since the stove still works either way.
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On Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 5:38:28 PM UTC-6, E. Robinson wrote:

from

I was referring to another thread https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en# !topic/alt.home.repair/ZzfWlXSiE7w
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 21:47:08 -0000 (UTC), "E. Robinson"

At least you got this far without getting electrocuted.
Was anything plugged into outlets on that circuit? Could be one of them.
Could be the breaker has a small piece of plastic or other thing stuck inside.
NOW is the time to determine what outlets and lights are on that circuit. If it blows again, unplug everything and shut off all those lights. If it still blows, buy a new breaker for $5. *Shut off your outside MAIN*, replace the breaker with new one.
If that fixes it, you know the breaker was failing. If it trips the new one, you probably should call an electrician, or you may have a fire.
But if you keep the main power off, I suppose you could remove and carefully look at each light fixture all wirenuts, all wires, check for any bad or frayed wires, loose screws, etc. Same for all outlets on that breaker.
Take your time and look at EVERYTHING CLOSELY.
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 18:24:22 -0600, Paintedcow wrote:

I'm gonna replace the breaker as a matter of course. However, I do need to map the circuit to see what is affected by it.
I will keep an eye out, especially at the next rainstorm.
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On Fri, 22 Jan 2016 01:17:05 -0000 (UTC), "E. Robinson"

I would replace it too.
Easiest way to trace outlets is with a plug in radio. Plug it in, (LOUD) shut off breaker. If it stops playing, that outlet is on that breaker. Saves a lot of running around. Lights are a lot easier. Turn all of them on. Shut off that braker and see which ones go off.
You could have an outdoor outlet on that breaker too and that is why rain effected it. Check them too. Outdoor ones should be a seperate breaker and have a GFI outlet, but that dont mean it was wired properly.
Dont forget range hood, exhaust fans, heat tapes, garbage disposal furnace, basement/attic outlets and lights, sump pump, etc.
I like to trace my whole house and write it, and hang it near the box. Those diagrams on the breaker box door are never big enough.

You could have water leaking into your breaker box if the entrance head is loose or cracked (if it's overhead wires). I have seen that happen!
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On Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 9:01:35 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I have *had* that happen. When it happens, the water will run inside the outer jacket of the service cable, even uphill, and enter the box.
When I had my problem, it was after an ice storm that pulled the cable off of the house. Before I had a chance to fix it at the top of the house, I was getting water in the box during thaws. There was a dip in the cable where it ran horizontal before coming into the house. That dip was the lowest part of the cable, so the water was running uphill (slightly) before it came into the house. Think of a trap, but much, much shallower. Just a dip. I cut a tiny slit in the outer jacket at the bottom of the dip and water dripped out for a few minutes. I never got any more water in the box after that. In the spring I fixed the cable at the top of the house then siliconed the slit.
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 19:55:23 -0600, Paintedcow wrote:

All wires going into homes in this area *must* by code be underground.
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E. Robinson wrote:

Is your meter located indoor near the panel then? In our neighborhood no over hang wires at all electroic feeder comes up from the bottom of exterior wall into mounted meter, right behind meter is panel on inside wall usually.
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On Thu, 21 Jan 2016 23:27:56 -0700, Tony Hwang wrote:

The meter is outside.
There is a power pole about 25 feet away with a transformer on it, just for me.
The wires go into the ground at that point, and then come back up into the meter on the OUTSIDE of the attached garage.
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In typed:

I just posted elsewhere in this thread about a situation that I once had where water was getting into the meter box on the outside of the house, then ran down INSIDE the feed wire from the meter box to the panel insode the house, and the water dripped into the panel from INSIDe tha feed wire. So, even if the feed wire to the house is underground, it is possible for water to get into the panel box from inisde that feed wire. Again, unlikely, but possible.
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That's what the "drip loop" is there for. Around here if the inspector doesn't find that "drip loop" he is very likely to give you a deficiency report.
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typed:

On the property where I had the water-inside-panel problem, there is a drip loop up at the top of what I think maybe is called the mast head (or something like that), where the power line from the pole meets the service drop that goes down into the top of the meter box.
Where it comes out of the bottom of the meter box, there is no drip loop. It just runs down into the building and into the top of the electric panel. I don't know that I have ever seen a drip loop on that part of the service line coming into a building (below the meter), but I never really looked carefully to see if there is a drip loop there. Since the water was coming from inside the meter box (getting in through the top of the meter box), and was running INSIDE the wire going from there to the panel, I don't know if a drip loop in that line would have prevented the problem of water getting into the panel inside the house.
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wrote:

If the wire from the meter droops below the conduit exiting the meter box to the inside of the building, water cannot follow the wire into the building and into the panel.
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I may be wrong about this, but I think the purpose of a drip loop is to have water that is on the outside of the wire drip off at the low point of the loop rather than running down on the outside of the wire into a structure etc.
But, I think that any water that is INSIDE a conduit will continue to flow inside that conduit down into the drip loop then back up and then down again to the lowest point in the conduit down below. If it were water inside a hose, as new water flowed into the hose at the top of the hose the water inside the hose would continue flowing down to the lowest point further down at the end of the hose. This would be similar to a sink drain and trap -- where the trap is in effect a "drip loop". Similarly, water on the outside of the sink drain would drip off at the bottom of the trap. But water inside the drain line would continue to flow down to the end of the drain line and would continue past the "drip loop"/trap.
In the scenario that I had where water was getting inside the conduit and going into the panel, if the conduit had a drip loop in it, I could have cut a small slit in the conduit wrap at the bottom of the drip loop to let the water inside the conduit drip out there rather than continue down into the panel inside the house in the basement. Of course, that would only have been a temporary fix until I corrected the problem of water getting inside the conduct from the meter box. In my case, there was no such drip loop in that part of the conduit (from the bottom of the meter to the panel below inside the house in the basement).
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wrote:

The water is not IN the conduit. It gets into the meter box, and with no drip loop the water runs down the cable into the conduit (which goes out the back of the meter box), With the loop, it runs down the wire to the bottom of the loop and drips off - then runs out drainage hole at the bottom of the meter box

The secret is to keep water OUT of the conduit.

There is NEVER a "drip loop" in conduit.
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Maybe we are not both talking about the same thing. I am not exactly sure what the term "conduit" means, but in my case I was using the term "conduit" to mean the heavy gauge, gray-wrapped, "service feed" that runs from the bottom of the meter box down into the building and into the top of the electrical panel inside the basement. It is the same kind and gauge of cable as the service drop that comes down along the outside of the building and goes into the top of the meter box.
Using my definition of "conduit" to mean that cable that runs from the bottom of meter box down into the building and into the top of the panel, my "conduit" DID have water running INSIDE that conduit and into the panel. The water was not running down the outside of the "conduit", it was INSIDE the gray-wrapped cable and came out of the inside of that gray-wrapped cable and dripped into the panel.

Yes, of course

I thought that you wrote earlier that there must be a drip loop in the conduit that I was describing as part of the code requirements when you wrote,

But, maybe we were talking about two different things.
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wrote:

Not what I was talking about at all --

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