charger amps

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Does it make any difference on output amperage if output voltage is the sam e in wall plug/USB charger adapters? Referring to 1 amp vs 1.8 amps. Forme r is for iPhone & latter for Kindle Fire HD. Was hoping to use one of thes e adapters rather than having to buy another one for Samsung Intensity II p hone. Both have 5 volts output.
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On Friday, September 6, 2013 8:23:21 AM UTC-4, Frank Thompson wrote:

ame in wall plug/USB charger adapters? Referring to 1 amp vs 1.8 amps. For mer is for iPhone & latter for Kindle Fire HD. Was hoping to use one of th ese adapters rather than having to buy another one for Samsung Intensity II phone. Both have 5 volts output.
As long as the replacement has at least as many amps as the original you're OK.
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Frank,
The output amperage is the maximum output that your power supply will put out. As long as that amperage exceeds the needs of the powered device, you'll be fine. So, the Kindle 5 v charger will work with the phone. The phone 5v charger may not work with the Kindle and may get hot et c..
Dave M.
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On 9/6/2013 7:23 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

Most of the 5 volt "wall warts" with 2.5mm plugs that are made for powering and charging smart phones and tablets are rated at 2 amps or 2,000ma output, at least all those I've seen. I have to order a charger for a tablet that has a 2.5mm plug because that tiny plug is not that common yet as is the ubiquitous 3.5mm plug and is very hard to find locally. O_o
TDD
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Amazing, the supply not caught up with the demand. Of course, you can likely find them on Ebay or Amazon.
I think standardizing is a good thing. Less crap in the landfill. I've got several old cell phones, and each comes with a box, manual, batteries, charge plug, and, and, and.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/6/2013 9:08 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

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On 9/6/2013 8:29 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

All my Nokia phones can use the same charger unless it has the micro USB plug. ^_^
TDD
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On 9/6/2013 9:50 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Actually it appears that most new cell phones are standardizing on Micro USB. So it is nice to be able to use cig lighter to USB or wall wart to USB chargers and a separate cable, then if you need to hook to a PC you can as well. Only downside is USB current spec is 500 mA and lots of devices can charge faster than that; there's ways around it (connecting two pins together to let the device know that it's plugged into a charger not a PC etc. to select charge rate) but sometimes mixing and matching parts will result in a slower than desired charge rate. I actually had issues with that on an old HTC Evo; when using on the car charger it would discharge faster than it would charge while running a GPS enabled app (Waze, Trapster, Telenav etc.) so if I wanted to use the phone for navigation on a road trip I'd have to carry several spare batteries with me. Haven't had that problem yet on newer Motorola smart phones.
nate
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On 9/6/2013 8:57 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I like the fact that USB with its different size plugs is becoming a standard power/data transmission method but there are still a lot of variations that are maddening. There are adapters for different plug sizes but the way they're wired can be different which I've found to be quite irritating. O_o
TDD
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On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 10:21:41 -0500, The Daring Dufas

USB is a standard. Any charger or device with a USB A plug will be wired the same. Then you use a "standard" USB a to usb micro, or mini, or special, cable as required by the device
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On 9/6/2013 10:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
<snip> > USB is a standard. Any charger or device with a USB A plug will be

If only that were true! Well the first part is true, USB is a standard.
The second part is, unfortunately, not true.
What _is_ true, is that the +5 and GND pins will be wired the same. But what often matters is how the data pins are wired. Apple has a specific standard for the data pins based on how much current the charger can supply. Other manufacturers do different things. For example Asus, on the Google Nexus 7, requires that the data pins be shorted together to charge from a charger (not from a PC of course).

It's possible to construct a cable that works, or in some cases, buy a cable that has been modified so the data pins are correctly wired. You can also modify the charger, i.e. <http://www.instructables.com/id/Modify-a-cheap-USB-charger-to-feed-an-iPod-iPhone/ .
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On 9/6/2013 12:47 PM, sms wrote:

That's what I've run into. O_o

I hope somebody will produce a jumper box like I have for RS-232/422/xxx for USB so I can get things to function when I'm working on or testing something. ^_^
TDD
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On 9/6/2013 11:36 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

LOL, you're showing your age! I once built one of those RS-232 boxes using comparators and a green and red LED for each channel (prior to the availability of dual color LEDs, though I liked having the third state (no LED on).
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On 9/6/2013 3:22 PM, sms wrote:

I still use serial RS-232 connections for programming and control of some equipment but I've noticed little USB connectors showing up on newer models. Ask a young computer geek about RS-232 and he will look at you like you just handed him a rotary dial telephone. ^_^
TDD
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On 9/6/2013 1:36 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Yes, the serial interface is still widely used in industrial equipment. I keep an old laptop with serial and parallel ports to use for that sort of stuff.
I was once an applications engineer for the company that provided about 1/2 the RS-232/parallel port/floppy controller/keyboard controller. Some good geeky stories about that job.
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On 9/6/2013 6:01 PM, sms wrote:

My old Dell laptop with a serial port died and I haven't had time (code for lazy) to fix it so I'm using a USB to serial adapter with one of my newer old laptops to program routers, switches and phone systems. The Domino's Pizza stores once had dumb terminals and serial connections back to a server for order taking and I did a lot of serial networking back then. Along with the 1A2 phone systems the stores ran fairly well but the employees kept dropping the keyboards on to the floor and losing the buttons. Some of those kids were so stupid they swept the buttons up and threw them in the garbage. The old 1A2 phones were so robust you could beat a robber to death with one of them then use it to call the cops. I rebuilt a lot of those old systems and servers with the 8 port serial cards in the office computers and a dial-up modems to send info to the corporate office. I still have some of that stuff around and it still works. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Apple is notorious for thumbing it's nose at standards - but even apple uses the data lines as data lines and the power lines as power lines. The "smart charge" feature would only work on apple spec chargers. The "standard" works on computers, using them to charge apple devices because the computer power supply meets the "standard"
You are saying the cable connecting from the charger to the device needs the data pins shorted for the Nexus 7 to accept the charge, or the nexus shorts the data pins to turn on the charger? If it needs the pins shorted for the charger but not for the computer, it sounds like it is controlling the "specific" charger which is not a USB device but uses the USB plug?
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On 9/6/2013 2:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A charger with a USB socket doesn't send data back and forth. The Apple chargers (and aftermarket chargers for Apple devices) follow Apple's "standard" for telling the iOS device the available current by setting the voltage levels of the data pins. Plug the same Apple cable into the USB port of a computer and the computer communicates with the iDevice to set the charge rate at 500mA.

That's true, but all the aftermarket chargers just copy what Apple dows since it's not difficult.

No, the standard works on computers because the computer communicates with the Apple device and negotiates a charging rate.

The supplied charger has the data pins shorted. Aftermarket chargers do not.
However it should be pointed out that with the Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean) update this is no longer the case. I am running Android 4.1 (Ice Cream Sandwich) on my Nexus 7 because there are apps I use that won't work under Jelly Bean).

No.
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wrote:

If there is no apple software installed on the computer there is no data passed between the computer and the apple device with regard to charging rate, so the USB port on the computer provides it's standardized 5 volts. ( You are talking about the 5 pin micro/mini usb standard that has an ID pin (pin 4) which is either grounded or not grounded for host or slave ID . It is NOT the data pins that are shorted. Normal USB A and USB B is a 4 pin connector, + and - 5volts, and Data + and Data. -..

The supplied charger has the charging cable hard wired to the charger and has a 5 pin mini or micro USB plug with the ID pin grounded to indicate it is a "host" device - making the Android device or iOS device the "slave" device. The "slave" device then knows it is attached to a device specific charger and sets itself accordingly.
Without the grounded id, it sees itself as the host, and sets itself accordingly. Using a generic USB charger or a PC USB A port with a normal USB a to Micro or mini usb cable, there is no grounded ID pin.
It is still all part of the (extended) usb standard.
Under USB 2 and 3 there is a battery charging specification which specifies how much current the ports must be able to supply - 1.5 amps per port and maximum 5 amps on USB2 BCS 1.2, and as high as 2 amps per port under 3.1

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wrote:

The aftermarket can only copy Apple after Apple ships their stuff. Apple will change their "standard" without telling anyone. There are now manufacturers who supply charge controllers with programmable charging profiles to cover future Apple (and others') products.

Only within the USB standard. Few, if any, computers know about the Apple "enhancements" to USB. Again, Apple isn't alone, here.
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On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 13:28:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

*NOT* true. USB is a "standard" but fewer and fewer are following the standard for charging appliances. More and more are doing an "Apple" and rolling their own, using the same connector. Some will charge on a standard USB port, some won't.
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