Changing Building Materials to Metric

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You mean those building code manuals I have on my shelf in SI units don't exist? The oldest is from 1976 - it even has a code change based on research I did in university in 1975.
The fact that lumber is still made to the old dimensions only shows that converting to metric doesn't require conversion of all materials to new dimensions.
Mike
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The code manuals can be in metric. But are carpenters using metric tape measures or english tape measures? Lets hear from a canadian carpenter!
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My tape measure's got both.
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Most of my tape measures have both.
Carpenters will tend to use english measures for construction, but there will be times where they will need metric.
Basic construction materials are still (mostly) english measures. Plywood thicknesses are sometimes given as metric, depending on supplier/purpose.
Cabinet grade plywoods etc (especially that sourced from overseas) are often fully metric.
"Official" publications & standards (eg: building code, electrical etc) are officially metric, will give metric as the base/official specification, but will often include english measure equivalents. If there's a conflict, metric takes precedence.
Eg: roof sheathing/span table specifications are given officially in metric with english equivalents using "english" spec'd materials.
Other "fields" are more firmly entrenched in metric. Eg: surveying, transport weights and measures, containers, etc.
Generally speaking, a DIY or tradesperson's work is almost entirely english measure.
But once you get into manufacturing, especially those export related (except construction lumber or liquid fuels to the US ;-), metric takes over almost completely.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Am Samstag, 11. März 2006 22:25:32 UTC-5 schrieb snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com:

Mark this are questions only an american can ask. Guess how any development country goes along very well in metric. You have to give up a 2x4 what is not a 2x4 either. or rediculus nails and screw sizes where have only one purpuse "teach the biggest BS ever". The whole world do not have this problems you are pointing here. There is one way only. Change regardless to metric and dump everything you know or have done so far in Imperial. But imedieattly. Why, because Imperial is a one way DEAD END Road !!!!! As sooner you turn as better . The way back on track is horribel but just g ets worse every day PERIOD. Forgett about this flickering lightat the end o f this dead end Imerial Road, go out of that tunnel and back into the sun. Other countries are ahead in construction methods by 30 to 80 years !!! gue s why ? Because a 2nd grader can do there better math then any engineer in imperial US Add 5/32 + 19/64 + 3/8 in 4 seonds ohh for example add 0, 5 + 1.6 + 0,9 (numbers are not conversions) make the test your self with is faster? I bet you lost GRADE F sorry
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On 01/01/2014 02:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

LOOK AT THE DATE!!!!!!
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Yup, it is clear this guy has not bought plywood recently (even in 2006). It is all metric. They approximate 12mm as 15/32 and I bet that 4 feet is really 122 CM
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On 1/1/2014 3:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not really if you look at US manufacturers' spec's, they're in English units with metric equivalents...
Example from Georgia-Pacific current datasheet --
Available Types & Sizes (Sized for 4' x 8') Length (Minimum) 7'-11 7⁄8" (2.435 m) Width (Minimum) 3'-11 7⁄8" (1.216 m)
Building Code Performance Categories, Panel Thickness • 1/4 CAT, 0.234" (5.94 mm) • 11/32 CAT, 0.328" (8.33 mm) • 15/32 CAT, 0.453" (11.50 mm) • 19/32 CAT, 0.578" (14.68 mm) • 23/32 CAT, 0.703" (17.85 mm)
Specifications Length/Width Tolerance +0, –1⁄16" (+0, –1.6 mm), based on 4' or 8' value Straightness Tolerance ±1⁄16" (±1.6 mm) Squareness Tolerance ±1⁄8" (±3.2 mm) ...
NB that the thicknesses are actually 1/64" under the nominal, rounded to three decimal places. That is, nominal 3/4" is now in a 23/32" category but the actual dimension is shaved yet another 1/64".
23/32 --> 0.71875
32*0.703 --> 22.496 --> 22.5/32 --> 0.703125 --> *25.4 = 17.859375
OTOH, 19/32*25.4 --> 18.25625, way too far over to be just rounding.
AFAIK this is pretty much what all US construction ply is.
Now when get to foreign hardwood ply and the like there's no telling which it follows depending on point of origin.
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On Wed, 01 Jan 2014 16:54:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You will find that it's not 12mm, either. It won't even be the same on one edge as the other.
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On 01/01/2014 03:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

When I was in 7th grade around 1962 the teacher told us we better learn the Metric system because the whole US would be using it by 1970 and we'd be left in the dust if we did not know it.
The US will be using Whitworth before it goes Metric.
I actually have a few Whitworth "spanners" ...have no idea where they came from.
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Well, you're a couple of years older than I, but it was the same thing in our school in '62. I did learn the metric system (use it daily) but also see no reason to change everything else. Particularly in the age of calculators, it's incredibly easy to convert between the two in the few cases where it's necessary.

You funnin' us, right? ;-) The US is already metric. The inch is *exactly* 2.54cm.

England?
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On 01/01/2014 06:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

LOL

I live in the US but just happened to recall that wrenches are "spanners" over there. I owned a TR-3 for many years and though I used "regular" English tools with it...there may have been a few Whitworth bolts on it.
However...metric really is easier as you do not need to calculate what size is smaller 9mm or 10mm for example
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If you can't figure that out without hurting your brain, you really shouldn't be working where you need wrenches. There is *nothing* to be gained by converting, at this point, and a lot to lose.
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On 01/02/2014 11:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I don't recall saying anything about converting
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Umm, why else would you bring up one vs. the other and that was sorta the discussion.
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On 1/1/2014 6:25 PM, philo wrote:

Yes, Metric is the wave of the future.
Your spanners from England?
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Christopher A. Young
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On 01/01/2014 06:10 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't know where those wrenches came from...
Since they are Whitworth I guess they are spanners though.
My whole house is full of weird stuff...and that includes me.
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On 1/1/2014 3:51 PM, philo wrote:

Sure is raisin questions.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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Canada went through this all many years ago. While Canada is officially metric, we all work with both systems. Adding to the complexity, we had a different gallon and pint than the US. We used the Imperial measurement, while the US had its own. Temperature is given on the Canadian news in Celsius, but we easily convert to Fahrenheit in our heads when we watch US news. I buy a length of 4 inch PVC plastic pipe with the size of 100mm printed on its side. Regular threaded pipe is known as nominal 3/4 inch size. I buy a pound of meat in the stores and get just under one half kilogram. You learn to work both ways and use the system that fits best the job at hand. As a former graphic designer/typesetter and have rulers that are in points, picas and fractions of an inch that most people don't use such as 1/10", 1/6", and others -- again I use whatever works best and easiest.
Don't sweat it, it all works out in the end.
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EXT formulated on Thursday :

We (Aus) changed back in the 70s with much the same results as Canada except we dont have a recalcitrant neighbor so the general public take up has been more complete. Weather Temperature is almost universaly accepted in Celcius.
Anything a bit mechanical is a different story. We have Whitworth bolts in inch diameters and mm lengths sometimes. In fact maintenance of anything has to stick to its original sizes whatever that may be.. Timber has all changed but I have little or no experience. Ordinary Pipe was British standard pipe before and now 1inch pipe is 25 mm without any change because the inch was inside and the outside was very approxomate anyway The tread is tapered. Tyres are on 15 inch rims and 195 mm wide for example:-Z Of course anything scientific has been metric CGS and latter MKS systems for ever.
--
John G

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