CFL bulb in range hood ?

Page 3 of 4  
On 12/16/2013 08:13 AM, HerHusband wrote:

My back hall is very cold and when I first turn on the CFL it gives almost no illumination at all...even after a few minutes it still does not come up to full brilliance. That said...they are an improvement over the original ones.

Thanks for the info, next time I go to Home Depot I will get a few and try them out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have been using CFL bulbs in our outdoor fixtures for the last several years. While the fixtures are mostly weather tight, they are open on the bottoms. I honestly did not expect the CFL's to last outdoors, but I think I've only replaced one of them in the last five years.
The outdoor CFL's are generally quite dim when they first come on, and it can take several minutes for them to reach full brightness. Especially if it is really cold outside. But, the lights are on timers, so they usually come on an hour or more before we need them. Since these lights are on several hours each day, the energy savings has been worth it.
I will probably try the CREE LED bulbs in the outdoor fixtures when the CFL's die just to see if they work OK.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lots of LED fixtures, bulbs and controls are now available for residential applications. There's a catalog of the best ones at www.lightingfortomorrow.com based on an annual competition. LED fixtures started showing up in 2006.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2013 09:12 AM, = wrote:

Thanks for the info!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
philo wrote:

I put in a shatter proof CFL bulb. There is such a thing. I got couple from local HD store.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/14/2013 01:23 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Great idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/14/2013 10:15 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

This is true. I do so little cooking on the stove top, that I'm not really concerned about the heat issue, but the HD guy did make me wonder if that was a valid concern should I ever get the urge to cook. And yes, I'm more interested in the longevity/positioning angle.
Maybe I'll just go stock up on some more incandescent bulbs, since for now I'm keeping a stock pile to use with my X10 modules.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IMPORTANT point. Range hoods that have a switch that changes the lights from bright to dim just switch a diode in and out of the circuit. In the dim mode, that operates the bulbs on half-wave dc. The electronics inside a CFL bulb won't like that at all.
On half-wave dc, incandescent bulbs draw half power which results in roughly 1/3 the rated light output.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
philo wrote:

I am 76 years old. When I was a kid and they had mercury in thermometers, we used to break them and play with the mercury.

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

As has been pointed out, here. Metallic Mercury isn't very toxic at all. The body doesn't know what to do with it. Many Mercury compounds are extremely toxic, however.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is all about the vector. I know of a Indian tribe that mined mercury. They died. Liquid mercury does not have an easy vector into the body unless ingested/inhaled. Handling the stuff without protection over a period of years will have harmful effects.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 Dec 2013 13:44:58 -0600, "Irreverent Maximus"

No, it's about chemistry. Metallic mercury isn't digested. Some Mercury compounds are, quite readily. What isn't digested...
Metallic Mercury isn't found in nature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Lewis and Clark took doses of liquid mercury on their 1804 western expedition as a laxative. Clark lived to be 68; Lewis died, probably of suicide, at 35. One biography says that he suffered from alcoholism, depression and perhaps syphilis or malaria. Was mercury involved? There's some talk of exhuming his body. Maybe we'll find out.
I've been exposed to liquid mercury and mercury vapor for almost 40 years because I worked where fluorescent lamps were tested and manufactured. I've also got several mercury amalgam fillings. Now at 75, there's nothing in my medical history indicating any health issues from mercury. All that I've read says that it's mercury compounds and especially methy mercury that does the damage. The Berkeley dudes who wrote the article at: http://www.lamprecycle.org/public/images/docs/LD+A%20August%202009.pdf got it right in my view. They say that breaking a CFL results in exposure to mercury that is about 1/50 of what you get by eating a "single nibble" of Albacore tuna. How many of you have been around the broken pieces of a 4-foot fluorescent bulb or worse, an 8-foot fluorescent? If so, those bulbs can contain up to 1,000 times more mercury than a CFL.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, December 14, 2013 9:40:07 AM UTC-5, Lee B wrote:

I would agree with the folks at HD. It might work, but for how long depends on the heat. Is it a gas range or electric? Gas would be worse. Having it mounted sideways is OK, it's upside down that some of them don't like. Covering it up adds to the heat issue, at least usually. In your case, it might help. If it's covered up, it then depends on how much air is inside the enclosure, can some air get in from behind to move heat, etc. I have a 100W CFL in an enclosed globe fixture under a fan and it's lasted a very long time. I've had others that have failed early that were not in enclosures, so who knows. A lot also depends on the particular bulb. Which ones are good, who knows.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, December 14, 2013 8:40:07 AM UTC-6, Lee B wrote:

We have a non-vented hood and we cook a lot...and I have had a CFL uncovered in the hood for many years (I think replaced once in a span of 5 years). I never use the fan...so heat and steam from cooking doesn't seem to be a problem. If yours' is covered, heat may build-up more.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/14/2013 9:40 AM, Lee B wrote:

Enclosed with the cover? That could make a difference if the electronics in the bulb overheat. Otherwise, I'd do it. Consider leaving the cover off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/14/2013 10:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
[snip]

So when the bulb breaks, pieces fall in your food? I put it back on (5 years ago).
--
10 days until The winter celebration (Wednesday December 25, 2013 12:00
AM for 1 day).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

use an LED?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have had a CFL in my range hood for 3 plus years. Zero issues with it and I have yet (knocking on wood) to have to replace it. CFL's are a crapshoot. GE and Phillips are now manufactured in China, I believe. The quality control from anything in China is suspect, at best. My experience with those brands is more on the disappointing side. However, at the box stores they are the brand that usually has the cheap multi-packs for sale. One might get lucky with them and have an attrition rate that is acceptable.
I have not purchased a CFL in quite some time. All of the ones I currently have are at least 3 years old. From what I hear Sylvania has the best quality, along with the highest pricing. So, choosing brand is your only concern. My friend is switching out to LED's, and I am quite surprised on how bright they are.
As for mercury? Worrying about one breaking is rather pointless. I have never heard of a lamp breaking on its own, and unless you are doing Ginsu maneuvers on the stove, concerns are minimal. Not to diminish the threat, but trace mercury exposure from a CFL seems a bit harmless. Repetitive exposure is what will give you heavy metal poisoning, not a one time trace amount.
Clean up of the problem, if it happens, is rather easy. "Proper" disposal is something else. Unless you keep the light on 24/7, just use a regular lamp or get a small, encased under cabinet fixture. Those lamps are cheap and if they burn out, replace.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/14/2013 6:40 AM, Lee B wrote:

incandescent appliance light bulbs will always be available. These are possible too low in wattage for what you want.
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.