Ceramic tile on kitchen floor?

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Kitchen remodeling is coming up soon, and SWMBO and I have a disagreement. I would like a ceramic tile, she's skeptical. Her biggest concerns are:
Ease of cleanup -- specifically, spilled food or drink getting into the grout. I figure proper sealing of the grout takes care of that, she's not sure.
Dropped dishes -- damage to the dishes, damage to the floor?
How easy is it on the feet, to stand on a ceramic tile floor while preparing a meal? (I'm the primary cook, so I'm not sure why she's worried about that...)
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On 10/17/2016 7:47 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

even on my wood floor in the kitchen, I use an anti-fatigue mat.
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On 10/17/2016 09:50 AM, Taxed and Spent wrote:

correct. a mat is a must.
I also would not go with a ceramic floor.
With even a little spilled liquid, it would be a real slipping hazard
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Not a whoile lot worse than hardwood or vinyl. I would definitely NOT use hardwood or laminate in a kitchen, except fot the stuff that looks like tile or stone and is made specifically for use in kitchens, bathrooms, and foyers. Normal laminate swells like crazy if it gets wet. Personally I would use a porcelain tile over a ceramic, any day of the week. The difference in price is a small portion of the complete job - and the quality is SO much superior.. That said, I have solid vinyl sheet floring in my kitchen and downstairs bath, porcelain tile in my foyer, and the bath and kitchen specific "laminate" tile product in the upstairs bath. I have 14mm laminate in my basement rec-room/office. and hardwood just about everywhere else (except for stairways and upstairs hall) We have anti-slip mats in the kitchen, upper bath, and foyer as well as at the sliding door from the deck to the hardwood dining room.
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On Mon, 17 Oct 2016 13:28:35 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My parents had a ceramic tile bathroom floor. It was slippery as hell. I was young at the time, and I fell a few times. But when my parents got old, they fell several times, my mother broke her hip, and smashed her head on the bathtub because of it. She ended up in the hospital. It was very dangerous. These were small tiles about 1.5" each. I would never recomment ceramic tile in a bathroom. Besides that, those tiles came loose many times from water splashed over the tub and my dad was constantly repairing that floor. After mom went to the hospital, and dad was deceased, I went there and bought some indoor-outdoor carpet and taped it down with two faced tape. She was very pleased when she got home.
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On Mon, 17 Oct 2016 16:00:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

You probably just did not get the right tile. The porcelain tile in our bathroom has small bumps on it so it is not slippery when wet. You don't really notice them until you run your fingers over the tile. The Lea Acero tile in the living room, kitchen and most of the rest of the house can get slippery when wet but we have rugs in the traffic areas, particularly near the doors by the pool where you might come in with wet feet. This stuff is as hard as chinese algebra and things that fall on it usually break but I have not lost a tile yet.
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On 10/17/2016 11:30 AM, philo wrote:

That depends on the finish. Gloss finish, yes, but plenty of others are available.
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My parents used ceramic tile for the kitchen floor. They'd never do it again, primarily due to its unforgiving nature.
Solid surface or stone make superior countertops.
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in writes:

like

Can you be more specific?
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They're getting long in the tooth, and tend to drop things more frequently then they used to. Where a drop on vinyl, linoleum or engineered flooring won't generally cause breakage, their experience has been that tile almost always does cause breakage.
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On Mon, 17 Oct 2016 14:47:23 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Consider using the larger sized, ADA certified slip-resistant, porcelain tiles. The larger size tiles result in far fewer grout lines, the porcelain wears like steel and the slip resistant surface prevents falls due to moisture on the surface.
The material is hard, so if you have butter fingers, use floor mats in the appropriate areas.
I would never use anything but porcelain in a kitchen or bath. After having dealt with inferior coverings, I learned years ago to use a timeless color / design and fix the floors one final time so I would never need to deal with it again.
I have also installed quarry tile throughout the rest of the house as we have lots of animals, children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. It is wonderful having tile, as cleaning the house is so much less tedious.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I guess every material has it pluses and minuses. I did my kitchen over 20 years ago with ceramic tile over a slab, and it still looks like new. One suggestion I would give is use a darker grout rather than a light one. Any dirt will not show as readily. I sealed the grout and I cannot find any staining or dirt.
To me the effect on feet is not a problem, and if it was a mat or rug would negate that. All in all, I am glad I did it with ceramic tile and would do it again in a heartbeat. If done correctly and not rushed, it will last a lifetime.
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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 10:47:46 AM UTC-4, Doug Miller wrote:

I've had ceramic tile kitchen floor for 30 years now.
Her biggest concerns are:

No sealer was ever applied to one kitchen. The other IDK for sure, but doubt it and if it was, it's long gone by now. Cleaning is not a problem, just typical mopping is all that's done. The grout is like concrete. I guess if you poured oil into it or something you could have a problem, but normal stuff, I haven't seen an issue. Grout also comes in various colors, darker I guess is better.

I have dropped some things that you think would break and they have not. But it's definitely a lot more likely than if it's vinyl. I have a couple cracked tiles, not sure they it's related to dropping though. I've never dropped anything, looked and seen it cracked. The cracking appears to be random and maybe due to not enough mud under it.

I have no problems, it fine with me. Modern shoes provide a buffer, no?
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On 10/17/2016 10:47 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I would take her side of the argument.
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On Monday, October 17, 2016 at 10:47:46 AM UTC-4, Doug Miller wrote:

...snip...

What do you usually wear in the kitchen? I'm a sock guy. Ceramic tile could be cold and hard. Have you considered in floor heating if you think cold will be an issue - especially as you age?
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Doug Miller wrote:

what does she want instead?

seal the whole thing several times.
i'd also put down a clear plastic matt in the high traffic areas around the sink/counters, kitchen table and fridge IMO.

shatters glass really well. :) can damage the floor if you have a poor install of any kind. and once you get a broken tile the patch job will stand out.

i use a very thick rug to stand on and that helps a lot, but you have to be graceful enough to not trip on it... :)
i'd never do tile or wood flooring in a kitchen (we have wood now and it is holding up ok, but shows spots where we've dropped things at times).
when i was a kid we had shag carpeting in the kitchen. talk about gross...
songbird
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Sheet linoleum...
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On Wed, 19 Oct 2016 02:03:32 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

SHIEEEEETTTTT MOFOCO !!!!!!!!!
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On Wed, 19 Oct 2016 02:03:32 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Our kitchen has sheet vinyl and it looks as good as it did when we bought the house 20 years ago. It's pretty thick stuff, and tough. I put some cheap vinyl in my previous house, and found out it easily nicked. No nicks in my current kitchen. My bathroom has porcelain tile. I used to think porcelain tile was the cat's meow, and still like it a Florida house - everywhere. But as long as you have quality work done, it all comes to personal preference. Don't worry about it.
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Linoleum is a rare product these days, it has mostly been replaced by sheet PVC. Inlaid linoleum was very tough except it was very flammable. It was originally developed for the US Navy for the interior decks of warships. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Navy ordered it removed from surface combatants because of the inflammability of the product. Surprisingly, it continued to be used in submarines until after the war.
Your wife is likely thinking about sheet vinyl flooring or PVC. In my humble opinion, vinyl flooring looks very cheap and I have experienced it being torn by moving a refrigerator and by replacing a dishwasher.
Tile, on the other hand, can increase the value and salability of your home and it is fireproof. If the hardness of the product is a concern, simply purchase a couple of anti-fatigue mats for the most used areas, e.g. cooktops, sinks, etc. See: http://amzn.to/2dqnAAU
I am in my mid 90's and am not allowed to discuss the age of my wife, but neither of us get fatigued when working in the kitchen. We very rarely break anything in the kitchen, I would estimate we break one glass a year.
All that said, if you can't demonstrate the logic of tile to your wife, I would suggest you just do what she wants and let her own it, maybe you can get out of washing the floors.......
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