Ceiling Fans

Does anyone have a ceiling fan in their bedroom, right above the bed, and if so, do you recommend it?
I am thinking about installing a fan above my bed, but would like some feedback first. Is it noisy, does the air blow directly onto your face, and does it make you feel uneasy with the blades spinning above your head?
Many thanks.
Kate
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We have one directly above the bed - 9 ft ceiling. Even on low, we did not enjoy the direct air blowing on us, but we solved the problem using the reverse switch on the fan. Now the air blows up to the ceiling and we get good circulation without being in a draft.
No, no noise at all.
Doesn't bother us that the blades are turning over our heads.
Bob-tx
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I know you are suppose to change the direction it is blowing seasonally but I always have mine blowing up.
Jimmie
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We have one and it is very quiet. Variable speed, it is set about as slow as you can go. The breeze is not so much as to bother my face. A for cooling, it is OK, but, depending on temperature, get better results with a window fan bringing in cooler air or the AC cooling the room down. My wife likes it, I could do without it.
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I have one above my bed and I think it is great. It is very quiet and I never have a concern about it spinning overhead.
I would like to have one with a remote control that I could keep on my night stand so I could turn it higher, lower or off if I wish without needing to get out of bed.
Freckles
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On Wed 29 Jul 2009 12:11:31a, Kate told us...

Yes, we have a ceiling fan directly above the bed. Most fans are very quiet, but that varies by brand and model. We have an Emerson. We operate ours on medium speed, and personally I like the feeling of the air blowing down, but for those who don't they can reverse the air flow and blow it up against the ceiling which will give overall room circulation without a direct breeze. I've never given a thought to the blades spinning above my head. The fan is securely mounted, as are the blades.
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Wayne Boatwright
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wrote:

I have one two and am very happy with it. I use the low speed setting and it's just a gentle breeze that feels great. The fan was just a basic inexpensive one, about $65 from Lowes. It has a remote, which I highly recommend for convenience and it makes a new installation much easier too.
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My first house had a fan that was so low that it bothered me and I removed it. Currently I have one over my bed but it's a 9 foot ceiling and it does not bother me. However, I only use it in the winter to circulate warm air because I prefer to use a tabletop fan or a fan blowing in from the window. I have found a tabletop fan to produce more of a breeze using fewer watts.
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I don't have any issues with the fan above the bed, but I don't like direct airflow blowing over me when I'm in bed, warm or cold. If you are concerned about the proximity, you can get ceiling hugger fans that do not have a downrod. They will be slightly less effecient that fans that have a larger gap between the blades and the ceiling, but it may not matter in a bedroom.
Most fans are reversable, so that instead of blowing air down, they lift the air up and push it out towards the walls. This setting is intended for winter use as it reduces the cooling effect of moving air but can be used any time.This may reduce (but not eliminate) the movement of air over the bed. The effect is less if you have one of the ceiling hugger fans.
On a low setting you won't hear the motor if the fan is of any reasonable quality.
BTW - if you are planning on replacing an overhead light fixture with a fan, be sure the electrical mounting box was designed for the weight of a fan. Most light boxes aren't. They sell retrofit fan boxes, but they take a reasonable amount of DIY dexterity.
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Kate wrote:

It feels like a wind tunnel and if you jump up it will cut your head clean off.
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Kate wrote:

remote. Very quite. We use it on a very slow setting, just to remove the air around in the room. We bought an oversize one for the size of the room and it has worked out great.
Chris
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Chris wrote:

Chris
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We have a lot of ceiling fans because my wife likes them but I think they are a huge energy waster when you have the A/C on. Why would you want to pull the heat out of the ceiling (attic) and push it down into the room. Reversing the fan only changes where the air comes down.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It's about equalizing the room temp so that the cold air doesn't pool on the floor forcing you to overcool the room. Moving air also feels cooler so you may be able to raise the thermostat setting and save a little.
Reversing the fan is primarily a winter thing to minimized air blowing on people and making them feel cooler, but still capturing heat at the ceiling and reusing it.
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wrote:

If you are blowing your cool air up against the ceiling you are cooling the attic.
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On Jul 30, 8:10am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Don't you have any attic insulation? You ought to see to that.
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On Thu, 30 Jul 2009 07:22:18 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton

Insulation slows the transfer of heat but it doesn't eliminate it. Blowing air against the ceiling only makes it worse. You would be better to allow a layer of warmer air to accumulate up there and decrease the apparent delta between inside and out. If you want to circulate air, do it closer to the floor with a small table fan That is particularly true at night in a bedroom where you are actually sleeping a few feet off the floor in the bed. What do you care if the air has stratified and it is 5-10 degrees warmer right next to the ceiling? The opposite will be true in the winter, when you want to get that warm air down where you can enjoy it and away from the cold ceiling.
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We have one with a remote controller. Usually run it on "low" at night. If it gets too cold (I find the dog on my pillow), then we can easily shut it off. It is right over the bed, FWIIW. 9' ceilings. Have had one in BR in both this and our last house.
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Kate wrote:

I had a ceiling fan in my last house, and when I moved I couldn't wait to have one installed in the new (well 1950's) house. It's centered in the middle of the room, so it doesn't it really doesn't blow into my face. It's not noisy; I can hear it a little, but it's more of a white noise. I've never worried about the blades spinning above my head. (I had someone else install it.... if I'd tried to do it myself, I would have worried <G>).
One thing I'm very glad I did with the new fan that I didn't have at the old place - I bought a remote control kit. That way if it starts to get too cool in the middle of the night, it's very easy to turn the speed down or off.
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Pay the money, get a good one and you won't hear it, or barely so. I have a Hampton Bay (Home Depot house brand) and it's very quiet. What I reeeeeeeally like about it is the remote control. -that- is a must-have. Fan and light control (it's even a dimmer, even though the wall switch is just on/off) all in one unit you can reach without having to sit up & pull a chain.
The only thing I don't like about it is the lack of a thermostat. If I could, I'd hook it up to a t-stat so that when it gets cold enough by the bed, it would shut off. A timer would also work.
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