caulking siding/foundation interface

When I have to caulk the bottom of the siding where it meets the foundation, I'm finding that its a colossal pain. Crawling around on my back through the weeds and bark trying to seal the gap between the siding, sheating, and foundation. Are there better ways to do it, or flexible caulking guns that allow you to at least stoop when doing it? Does anyone do this type of sealing or am I making my life too hard?
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condensation or other water to be trapped in the wall and cause rot. In other words, it acts as a ventilation, drain or weep area. I have experienced severe rotting due to lack of ventilation in other areas so I have not caulked that area of my siding.
Don Young
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the wallboard from the basement interior I found grass growing INSIDE the wall. Obviously the solution to that is to remove the plants from around the house, which I'm doing, but if grass gets in there so do beetles, spiders, and other nasties (like rats and mice). So I figure if I caulk the seam, nothing can get in.
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Eigen,
Nothing can get in but the siding isn't supposed to keep things out, it's supposed to shed rain. By caulking it you will seal in water and encourage rot. Hate to say it but if you thought caulking was hard you'll be amazed at how hard un-caulking is.
Dave M.
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What he said. You're trying to combine functions, which is usually a death sentence for one of the components of the system.
If you have grass growing inside the wall your grade level is too high. That has to be addressed before anything else. Then you deal with air infiltration and critter entrance. Caulking or expanding foam between the sill plate and foundation is the typical method. You're really just trying to slow things down as you'll never preserve sanity if you try to eliminate all possible means of entrance. That leaves the siding to do what it is designed to do - keep out weather and look good - and that's a maintenance thing.
R
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on my back wasn't looking too favorable.
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I doubt that you will shorten the life of your siding very much by 'trapping' moisture. The siding likely breathes an adequate amount to prevent problems and there really shouldn't be enough moisture behind the siding to actually need draining. Caulking will keep out the grass and beetles and even keep out the hot or cold air that you are paying to condition, so I see a net benefit in your case.
On Thu, 5 Jul 2007 19:42:43 -0700, "Eigenvector"

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You don't do this for a living, do you? The OP didn't mention what type of siding he has, and you're saying there won't be a problem. Do yourself a favor and read any vinyl siding manufacturer's installation info. They specifically say that the siding should not be considered waterproof, and that any water getting behind the siding must be allowed to drain. Caulking the bottom of wood siding or fiber cement siding is pretty much guaranteed to trap moisture and, at the very least, cause paint failure at the most exposed part of any siding - the bottom few courses - which is precisely where it needs the most protection.
Your advice is akin to covering your teeth with chewing gum to prevent cavities. I realize you're trying to help, but you're not.
R
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