Cathederal Ceiling

This is a dumb question, but if you put in a cathedral ceiling in a room would it require more heat in the winter to keep the room warm?
Tracy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heat rises, doesn't it? The higher the ceiling the more the heat rises to fill the space.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So you need a fan up there to push it back down
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James Repetski wrote:

It depends - while heat loss is a function of room volume (among other things), the slope of the ceiling doesn't matter. So if you compare two rooms of equal volume - one with 11' ceilings against a room with a linear 8' to 14' cathedral ceiling for example, the heat loss will be the same.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nono. It's proportional to wall and ceiling surface exposed to the outdoors.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

A fine point, but one which I will concede willingly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Travis Jordan wrote:

And I omitted....don't forget about the floor / slab.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Travis Jordan wrote:

That's not exactly correct, but the OP is asking about keeping warm, not heat loss. He's also not asking about which size room is easier to heat. The only variable is the ceiling configuration.
Higher ceiling, more volume, more heat required to keep a person warm...unless said person was bitten by a radioactive spider and spends quality time scurrying around the ceiling.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mech Engineer on bowleing alley project talked about stratification.. As I understand it, if the air is introduced at a given level with enough momentum / volume, zones of temperature above and below are separate. Is there an HVAC expert in the house? TB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Travis Jordan wrote:

Room A is 20x20x11, with 4400 ft^3 of volume and 2(20+20)11 = 880 ft^2 of walls and 20x20 = 400 ft^2 of ceiling, ie 1280 ft^2 of heat-losing surface.
Room B is 20xL, with V = 20x8xL+2x1/2x10x6 = 220L = 4400, so L = 20, with 2(20+20)8 of walls + 2sqrt(6^2+10^2)20 of sloped roof + 120 ft^2 of gables, ie 1226 ft^2 of heat-losing surface.
Room C is 20x20x8, with V = 3200 ft^3 and 2(20x20)8 + 20x20 = 1040 ft^2 of heat-losing surface.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Good analysis, Nick....thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Travis Jordan wrote:

Playing at math to show that a larger room has more surface area is an analysis...? More like a waste of time.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Travis Jordan wrote:

Some earlier RicodJour seems to have contradicted you... :-) Article: 723407 of alt.home.repair
Subject: Re: Cathederal Ceiling Date: 2 Jul 2005 16:52:21 -0700 Organization: http://groups.google.com
Travis Jordan wrote:

That's not exactly correct, but the OP is asking about keeping warm, not heat loss. He's also not asking about which size room is easier to heat. The only variable is the ceiling configuration.
Higher ceiling, more volume, more heat required to keep a person warm...
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James Repetski wrote:

There are a lot of factors and construction details will make a big difference.
I would say that in general there would be a little difference and it will require more heat in the winter. You may or may not be able to recover some of that with lower cooling cost during the summer.
Good construction will minimize the differences.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had cathedrals in my last house some places were almost 20 feet high. Summer time it seemed like the a/c worked longer than the previous house. Bills were about the same. Winter was comfortable to me. I live in Phoenix so the location your talking about would have a lot to do with the situation.
Personally I will not have high ceiling again. Just to echoie for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.