Can laminate counter top be covered up?

I have a counter top which is made of plywood with laminate on top. I don't really like the color, and it has a few burnt marks. We are thinking of getting a dish washer, which means I will need to move the refrigerator over 24". If I do that I need to extend the existing counter top for another 24". Since it will be very close to the sink, I would like to do this so the extension can be done as a seamless continuation of the existing counter top so if I wipe it down I can wipe it all the way to the sink.
One way I can think of is to construct a counter top at the same height as the current one, then apply a new layer of laminate on top of the existing one to form one continuous surface. Will this work? Can laminate be applied on top of laminate? What do I need to do with my kitchen sink which is now sitting on top of the counter? It needs to be removed and reinstalled?
Can I use any other materials? I don't want to use tiles, but what about stainless steel? Can a stainless steel sheet be applied over the laminate counter top to give it an industrial look?
Thanks in advance,
O
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Yes.
Laminate over belt sanded laminate. Be aware new laminate is subject to the adhesion of the original. Good stuck to bad = bad. Good stuck to good = probably ok.
Google replacing a kitchen sink or sink mounting clips.
Yes, but stainless is beyond the scope of novice DIY with limited skills and tools.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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You have to score the crap out of the original laminate. We did a double-up job when we bought our house last year. The counter is U shaped and very large, and the orginal (butcher block looking) was really stuck on. We belt sanded until we had really scored up the surface and used 3M (red can) contact cement. Do not use the Lowes blue can water based stuff, it doesn't stick. We did the counter and all edges ourselves and it looks great and has stayed down.
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wrote:

pictures?
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Here are some pics from the remodel last summer: http://home.columbus.rr.com/hoopthompson/housepics /
The counter was a butcher block pattern with the laminate installed as a backsplash about 12" up the wall also. We bought the laminate from Lowes and the adhesive from HD. Been on since last June and looks as good as a counter Lowes made for me years ago.
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That looks good. It looks sort of corian like from the picture.
O

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orangetrader wrote:

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Why not remove the existing first?? It is an easy few minutes work with a torch. I did my kitchen and don't think it took over 10 minutes with a helper, me running a Bernzomatic torch fairly rapidly over the laminate and helper lifting it up behind me. It doesn't take a lot of heat to get the contact cement to release.
Harry K
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Thanks,
I forget the Formica number, but it's a blue-green pattern that looks good over the large amount of counter there is. Last week I used the left overs to redo the counter in the half-bath adjoining the kitchen. That old laminate came off very easy, which figures since it's only about 3-4 sq. feet.
My semi-retired professional carpenter father-in-law had serious doubts about going on top in the kitchen, but it worked. And more importantly, my wife loves it - and it saved me a bunch of time from remaking a huge counter area.

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"Industrial" is all the rage right now. I'm amazed that friends bought an expensive house, and spent $100,000 fixing it up. They left the living room with exposed concrete slab, with faux tile lines and an impressive "industrial" look. When this fad dies out, they can put carpet over it!
I love the stainless look. I think it works well with laminate countertops. However, does the rest of your kitchen decor justify the stainless motif? I demand consistency, in my environment.
To me, stainless = "commercial kitchen," more than "industrial."
I would not have a cast iron or porcelain sink on top of the counter, because the inevitable dam prevents wiping the countertop into the sink. A stainless drop-in might be an exception, because the damn is very low. My painted cast iron sink is mounted at a level below my tile counter.

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