Can I run drill off of car battery

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George do you mean lead acid is fully charged at 12.7 at 80f. I have one rated for more but maybe 12.7 is the correct average, Nicads do peak at 1.32-1.35.
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12.65 volts is 100%
http://www.uuhome.de/william.darden/carfaq4.htm
Section 4.4
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Rich256 wrote:

because of temperature compensation and many volt meters (maybe most) are less than 1 percent accurate for the readout.
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m Ransley wrote:

Yes, as Rich points out and provide a highly rated link, the generally accepted figure is 12.65V for a 12V lead acid battery, but not all sources use that number and certainly most people can't measure that accurately.
A new 1.5 alkaline dry cell usually reads 1.60V or slightly. The NiMH and Nicads are considered to be 1.2V cells, but a fully charged NiMH gets to about 1.35V, and the common 7.4V Li-ion battery reads 8.25V or so at full charge. OTOH, a NiMH that reads 1.2V or a Li-ion battery that read 7.4V is essentially depleted.
Using different kinds of batteries can be a bit of a mess. Stuff made for alkaline cells, sometimes just won't run on nicads or NiMH cells because the appliance won't work when the voltage is below 1.25-1.3V. For example my GPS made for alkaline indicates that freshly charged NiMH cells are half discharged.
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On Sat, 7 Jan 2006 13:07:07 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

One measure of power is watts, and watts is amps x volts. So amperage is only current. It's not a measure of power until the voltage is factored in.

I agree with George. The charging voltage when the engine is running is I think 13.4, but the fully charged battery I've always figured at 12.6v. That's, 2.1 volts for each cell.

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wrote:

The risk of explosion is low, but not for that reason, It doesn't take a large amount of current to cause a hydrogen explosion, and if there is a 10 amp fuse, 9 amps is a plenty large current if it isn't in the wire.
If the current is in the wire, a far larger current is not sufficient to cause an explosion. Consider the hundreds of amps used by the starter motor when the car is started.
Any tiny spark can cause a hydrogen explosion, far less than one amp.
Why you don't see many is that hydrogen is only generated when the battery is charging, not when it is being drained** and in this case the guy using the drill probably won't need to run the engine to run the drill. And a hydrogen molecule is the lightest of all molecules, and they float away as soon as they escape from the battery. Since they are generated under the battery caps, and I think, not sure, that maybe only escape rather slowly, that they tend to build up under the battery caps, and if a spark, from a loosely connected drill, for example, ignites the small amount of hydrogen outside the battery, the burning can spread to the larger amount inside, and that is the explosion.
**Although since one would drive the car to where the drill was going to be used, it would have been charging recently.
The draining, the discharging of the battery, requires hydrogen, but it takes it out of the sulfuric acid in the battery, because the acid is the electrolyte,, and I don't think will normally take it from the gas above the acid.
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On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 18:08:37 GMT, Steve Kraus

Thanks for all replies. I agree on the fuse. I know the lighter socket is fused, but if I use that gel-cell I will need a fuse. Does anyone have any idea of the amperage draw on these drills?
Yes, I know Skil is crap. But I got the thing so I may as well use it till its dead. Having a drill in the car is sort of handy actually. One never knows when they might get a toothache while travelling. ---- Drill out tooth, fill with Bondo ---- <LOL>
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On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 14:57:37 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

I have an old 12v drill I got from a construction site dumpster. (batteries cost as much as a new drill) I put a lighter plug on it with a 20' cord and I use it on my boat for repairing Nav markers and such.. Works great.
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Sure, many people have done it. Biggest problem is getting the car close enough to the work, especially if you are putting up curtain rods in the upstairs bedroom.
Skil tools are low end. They meet a price point for the infrequent user and as in all battery drills, the battery is the first thing to go and can be very expensive. On more expensive tools with better batteries, they can be rebuilt and be more cost effective. Any of the "pro" models will cost from $150 to $300. The Ridgid line is supposed to be good on the lower end. Ryobi is cheap and batteries are about $25. If you want the best, look at Panasonic, Bosch, Festool.
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you can also use a hgh current AC adapter, 120 V in 13V out in whatever current rating you want.advantage of this is having a handy 12 volt source for other uses, even a car battery charger should do. if its current capacity isnt enough the worst that can happen is a drill with less power
have a friend who tears apart battery packs and replaces just the cells, which he has found are always regular rechargeable batteries. cheaper alternative if your handy and dont mind slodering wires.
Its sad so much is disposable today, battery pack could easily be made to accept new rechargeable batteries
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wrote:

I think what all this amounts to is that unless one has a lot to spend on tools, it's better to invest in extension cords. They have many uses.
Once I wanted to drill a hole in the top cap of a chain link fence, in the woods. I thought Cool, I'll use my converter. But the little converter wasn't big enough to run the drill. I hadn't noticed how much current drills use. The same reason it takes money to make a cordless drill. (I ended up taking off the top cap and taking it home to drill it. Still haven't used the converter for anything.)
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

use a 12 volt battery, will work perfect as long as you use the right wire. That drill can draw a lot of amperage so you need to connect directly to the battery. You should not be using wire smaller than #6. Battery cables may be big enough but you still need to keep the length fairly short. There is a reason the lugs on the drill batteries are heavy and that the batteries are attached to directly to the drill.
Try it with not less than battery cables and feel the cables for a temperature rise.
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wrote:

I really don't see that a wire that heavy is not needed They don't draw that much current. Nuber 10 should be more than adequate. Even a 20 foot long wire (total of 40 feet) would have a resistance of 0.025 ohms. So it would take almost 50 amps to get one volt of drop. I am using about a 14 gauge which works fine.
However, stalling is a problem with DC motors. When stalled the back emf drops and it is possible to burn them out.
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yu could use a car battery charger provided it has enough amp capacity
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:

Could, don't know why you'd want to do it, though. It would have the worst features of a cordless and a corded drill. Probably time to shop for a new one.
R
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to determine the amperage draw run the 12 volts in series thru an ammeter while you drill a 3/8" hole in a 2"x4" piece of wood to load its motor. size the fuse accordingly to be in series with the cigar lighter male plug which is already protected to 10 to 30 amps by your vehicle. there is probably a cigar male plug with fuse at radio shack or pep boys. or read the technical information on the label. or simply shop for less expensive replacement batteries but do the homework on the battery type to match the charger type. we prefer the 12 volt makita cordless drills and found a replacement battery with a built-in led light on it that illuminates the drilling area. watch the weights as the drill voltages go up you may find some 18 volt construction duty cordless drills are excessive weight for minor occasional household uses or at the top of an extension ladder playing with the gutters. use a regular 110 v drill for major wood drilling jobs reduces wear and tear on your battery drills.
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I've got an old 12 volt Sears drill for just that reason. And then got a couple Drill Master from Harbor Freight for about $15 each.
Should work just fine. I'm not sure what's the smallest gage of wire that would work (don't know what the amp load is). I'd suggest 16 ga or larger wire. Which would be smaller number. I think it's a really great idea.
Of course, for $25 or so you could get a 110 volt plug in drill. I like saving old equipment like that, too. Some time this winter I've got a couple rechargable shavers that I'm going to externalize a battery for them.
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I use mine when out in my 5th wheel. Rarely have electric hookups but I have a couple golf cart batteries for power.
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You need a circuit breaker! that will limit a cranking style of battery (automotive) from frying the drill on stall....On top of that you probably want to use proper connectors as opposed to battery clips that might get pulled off and fry your vehicle's electical system..someone here said 30 amps...that might work...not sure what your model of skil drill is but I am guessing it is about 1.5 amp/hour...so that should do it....good luck....Ross
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