Cable connection for broadband & phone

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I jsut bought a all in one printer because I wanted a wireless printer and the FAX part. I needed to send a couple of FAX to my IRA bank. First time I have needed a fax in about 10 years. By catching one on sell, it is about the same as the ink refills.
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You will have a single coax cable running from the pole to your house. In my case, Comcast ran it underground using a vibrating plow (buries the cable without having to dig a trench).
I only get internet access from Comcast, so I have the simplest installation possible. The incoming cable connects directly to the cable modem. I then connect my VOIP phone adapter to my internet router.
If you will also have cable TV, the incoming cable will connect to a splitter. Then you will have cables running to each TV outlet throughout your house.
As others have mentioned, it is unlikely the cable installers will do a neat and tidy installation. For them it's about getting things done as quickly as possible with as little effort as possible. They'll drill holes wherever desired and staple cables to the outside of your home.
I chose to do the wiring inside our home before the cable installers came out. I installed a conduit from our crawlspace under the foundation to a point outside the building. The cable company then brought the cable to my conduit and gave me enough slack to make the connection inside. I let the installers know I was particular about the installation, and they were happy to accomodate my needs. It was more work on my part, but I have no visible cables on the exterior of our home.
If you do the wiring yourself, make sure you use high quality RG6 cable and compression style connectors. Those cheap crimp-on style connectors will really degrade your signal and cause problems with your internet connection. These days you can find the cable, compression connectors, and the compression tool at Home Depot. If you need a splitter, you might want to shop Amazon for a better quality splitter.

You will need a cable modem. You can either rent one from the cable company (typically about $5/month), or you can buy your own. I rented the first couple years then bought my own.
After the cable modem, you will probably want to buy and install a Wi-Fi router. This typically gives you four ethernet connections for your computers or devices, as well as providing a Wi-Fi signal for your mobile devices.
If you are getting your phone service through your cable, you will need a small phone adapter (usually provided by the phone service). This plugs into your router, then your phone connects to the adapter. I get my phone service through 1-VOIP instead of paying the cable companies higher rates.
If you have cable TV, you will also have a cable box or digital adapter at each TV.
We just use an outdoor antenna for our TV signal, then subscribe to Netflix for Movies.

If you disconnect the existing phone company from your house wiring, you can connect the VOIP adapter to your existing phone line. However, I found it easier to just get a wireless phone system. The base unit connects to the VOIP adapter, then I can place the other handsets around the house as needed.
Hope this helps.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Sunday, December 7, 2014 12:52:07 PM UTC-5, HerHusband wrote:

Depends on the cable company. Cablevision here gives you a cable modem, no extra charge.

That's what most folks do because they have wireless widgets that need connection.

Again, that depends on the cable company. If you get phone bundled in with Cablevision, you get a single unit that's both the cable modem and the VOIP adapter

I agree that today that makes the most sense. It's how I have it. No need to get twisted pair phone wiring to work at every phone jack in the house anymore.
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You may be able to talk the cable company out of some cable and connectors for free if you do the inside wiring. That assures them the cable is to spec. You may have to get a special tool just for the connectors they use as there are several differant kinds of connectors that fit the cable.
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On Sun, 7 Dec 2014 17:51:46 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Rogers supplies the good splitters for me at no extra charge

The current modem/router I have rented from Rogers includes the WiFi - it is a Hitron unit - modem, router and wifi in one.
They have replaced the modem 5 or 6 times since I signed on with thwm 15 or so years ago - a couple failures, the rest upgrades -and there is a better, faster modem available right now if I decide I want ot upgrade again. The last one was a modem/router without wifi which I connected to my own wifi-router (which I had also replaced several times over the last number of years since adding wi-fi) I could own my own modem for less money, but even being in the business, with the hassle of getting the "right" unit as a replacement when I need it, and having to deal with the hassle of "who's problem is it", I'll just keep renting the box. When it doesn't work, THEY fix it. For the TV I own one HD box, and get free rent for the first 2 years on the HDPVR.
One of these days I'll actually throw Bell to the curb and install my MagicJack as my primary phone service.

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Ralph,

The Comcast installers did give me an "approved" splitter, even though the one I bought separately was better quality. It didn't make any difference in my signal, but I used theirs just to keep the tech's happy. :)
Once I dropped cable TV, I didn't need the splitter anymore so the cable line now goes directly to my cable modem.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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Cool. Comcast seems to charge me for EVERYTHING!

Interesting. Does that lock you into Cablevisions VOIP service or can you use it with other VOIP providers?

I originally connected my phone wiring to the adapter. We ran it that way for a few years, then something went goofy with the phone wiring. It was easier to get a new wireless phone system than try to track down what was wrong with the wiring. :)
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Sunday, December 7, 2014 4:49:52 PM UTC-5, HerHusband wrote:

You can't use the Cablevision VOIP hardware with any other VOIP service. But you can use any other VOIP hardware and service, eg Ooma, Vonage, MagicJack, etc. That stuff is so cheap, it doesn't much matter.
.
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Interesting, I didn't know they made all-in-one devices like that.
Still, I have never been a fan of all-in-one units (i.e. TV/VCR combos). If one part breaks you have to replace the entire unit. I like being able to replace/upgrade each item individually.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Sunday, December 7, 2014 4:55:57 PM UTC-5, HerHusband wrote:

Except that the price of the integrated unit is typically about the same price as just one component, so doing it in two or more widgets is typically going to cost 2X+.
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Sasquatch Jones wrote:

My provider put a junction box on the back of my garage and ran the cable from the pole to the junction box, where he put a union in and then ran is underground (I had buried a conduit there) into the house and to a splitter. All that was necessary for cable TV; they didn't offer internet service at that time. My local ISP, where you could actually call and talk to a knowledgeable person, lost some key employees and was sold to a larger company. So when my cable company offered internet service I switched.
They came out and attached another splitter, which they ran to what they called a modem, and since my computer was in a corner of the house and the basement, they put the "modem" there, with a cable running to my computer. I remember there were a lot of service calls then, as they tried to get the signal compatible with my TV and my Computer. Years passed and my desktop became outdated, so I bought a laptop. Who looks on the back and sides of a laptop to see if there is a printer port? Not me. So I ended up getting a wireless router and a new printer. It was nice to get rid of a lot of wires, and to be able to move my stuff anywhere.
Why do I write this? Because we are all moving to a wireless environment, and you should plan for that.
We progressed to three computers and the printer, with nary a wire. But when we added two smartphones, that can hook up to WIFI, we were losing and missing calls because the phone service providers apparently didn't put network coverage in our area, and my wireless router, stuck in a corner of the basement by the "modem" couldn't get adequate coverage to the whole house (apparently laptops have a good antenna and can handle a weak signal, while smartphones fall short). So I bought a more powerful wireless router and spent a lot of dirty hours moving the "modem" and router to the center of the house, and all is well.
My suggestion for a first installation is that you have them run the cable to a centralized location, which has power, and be ready for an eventual move to wireless.
My son in California has, I believe TWC, and when they installed it they ran the cable along the baseboard to the cabinet where he has a router and more cables to his TVs. Wiring is hard out there as the homes are all built on slabs, and I can't think of a better way to do it.
When I signed on for phone service from my cable company they gave me two phones; one is the base and has a charger unit wired to the "modem" and a power supply, and the second has a holder wired to a power supply. Both have the warning that they don't work if there is a power supply, but if we have an emergency, I'll just run outside with my smartphone and build a cell tower. I can't remember ever using those phones. The cable company offered a deal where if I added phone service for $20 a month as part of a bundle, they would reduce my payment by $50 a month, and I can still do math.
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On Sunday, December 7, 2014 5:06:20 PM UTC-5, No name wrote: .

.
Several of us have mentioned a wireless router now, but you bring up a good point, which is location. So far, haven't heard if the OP needs wireless now or not, but most of us do and your point of at least taking the location for a wireless router into consideration is a good one. Some centralized location would be ideal, but it doesn't have to be centralized. I have my wireless router on the second floor at one end of the house and get good coverage down to first floor at the other end. If it were easy and practical central would be better. But the closer you can get to that, without a lot of trouble, the beter.
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On Sun, 07 Dec 2014 11:12:32 -0600, Mark Lloyd

About 1966, 48 years ago, I found the exchange that served my area in Chicago, and I went there and saw the guy in front of me punch in the code number. I wrote it down right after.
But I never had nerve enough to go in. I was a little reckless, but I figured they'd catch me in 20 seconds. Surely they knew everyone that ever went inside.
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On Sun, 07 Dec 2014 11:09:13 -0600, Mark Lloyd

I hate to boost new technology, especially in contrast to the failings of other new technology, but now you probably have a cell phone which you can charge from your car if it runs out.
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On Sun, 7 Dec 2014 21:55:36 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

The advantage in this case is you don't need to worry about compatability and arguing with your supplier about which part is causing the problem. If you supply your own router/wifi device and you have trouble with your internet they will make you chase your tale for an hour proving the problem is not with YOUR hardware.. Then when they decide it IS your problem, and you get a new one and it STILL doesn't work - - - -.
Been there, done that, with Bell on customer's systems. As I said before - being in the computer business I can buy a router/wifi CHEAP. I can buy a cable modem for a few bucks less than Rogers will sell it to me for, and buy another one when I need an upgrade or it fails. Added into my monthly bill and expensed it's not worth my while to own the darn thing. (and GENERALLY I would rather own anything than rent it - water heaters, water softeners, cars, homes, computers, Just about anything.)
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My router is located near my computer in my home office so it's easy to connect the computer, VOIP adapter, network printer, etc. However, the location under my desk is not ideal for Wi-Fi coverage.
So I ran a network cable up to my "attic" space and added a wireless access point there. It is up high, right in the center of the house, so I get great coverage anywhere inside and most places outside as well.
In my experience, the cable connection is more finicky than ethernet cables. Any cable connection that was less than perfect, or a splitter that was not up to par, would completely wipe out my internet service. In comparison, I can plug in a CAT5 cable and run it just about anywhere with no issues.
I recommend putting the cable modem as close to the incoming cable as possible, with as few splitters as possible. You can always add an access point to improve wireless, or network switches to get more network connections.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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Installer will be here Wednesday. Until then, only phone jockeys with limited technical info. I posted a sketch at alt.binaries.schematics.electronics and alt.binaries.schematics.electronic. Does the routing shown look reasonable?
SJ
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Thanks, AW. In my case, it will take about 50-feet of cable to go from the outside interconnection box to the computer. Would I get a faster connection if the modem is located near the outside box or near the computer?
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On Mon, 8 Dec 2014 18:50:22 -0800, "Sasquatch Jones"

Nope. If the cable is good the length has virtually no effect on the computer signal. Multiple connections can though.
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On Monday, December 8, 2014 10:00:26 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agree it should make no significant difference, but it's also different cable. From the modem to PC it would be Ethernet cable, unless he opts for USB, which I would not recommend. If he were to use USB between the modem and PC, that's only spec'd for 5M. I still haven't heard if he intends to include a wireless router. If so, then the connection is cable modem to wireless router to PC. I'd still use ethernet for the connection to the PC, instead of wireless, if it can be done without a lot of wiring effort. It gives a potentially higher speed connection, more reliable, etc. Wireless is best for stuff that can't be easily directly connected via ethernet to the router, needs to move around like a smartphone, etc.
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