Buying new TV

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Some years back, Stereo Review magazine blind tested expensive speaker wires versus lamp cord. No difference.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Did their study note that the quality of the connections can make a difference? I use a thick gauge of lamp cord instead of fancy speaker wire, because I am a cheap SOB, but all my vintage sound equipment uses push-in or binding post connections. For sound and video applications where the cable needs ends put on it, the connectors on the cheaper pre-mades are usually crap. The gold-plated connectors are probably meaningless unless you live on a beach, but a quality connector and a decent gauge of wire probably helps. Of course, I am not talking about modern miniature stereos, DVD players, and tiny speakers. The cables that come with those look like fishing line to me.
--
aem sends...

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^^^^^^^^^^
what does that mean? I've been meaning to ask you for years ;-)
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G. Morgan wrote:

Means I worked for the government too many years. Back before the real world had email, the government had something in-between e-mail and old-style telegrams. Had to have specific formats. Whoever wrote the words, even if some drone actually walked downstairs to the electro-mechanical terminal to send them, got to put their initials at the bottom as author. (so they could be praised or flagellated later as needed.)
I probably oughta to come up with a normal sig file, but after this many years, I'm kind of used to it.
--
aem sends..

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We'd all miss it too.
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aemeijers wrote:

Many of the professional sound system installers for nightclubs use rubber insulated #14 or #12 SO cord for speaker wiring. I'll use a lot of plastic jacketed #18/2 stranded for 70 volt PA systems going with a larger gage wire for the primary link only when getting into power levels of 100 watts or more.
TDD
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On 05/22/2010 09:19 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

You can count me in with the "heavy gauge zip cord" crowd. I do tin the ends to keep things neater. Maybe I'm missing out on something, but if I am, it's not really that important to me.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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You aren't missing out on anything.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I don't know if you're familiar with SO, SOW, SOOW cord types but I use them for low impedance speaker wire in commercial settings due to the ease of pulling during installation, durability and better resistance to damage. The cable is round with thick insulation.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/25d7nbb
TDD
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Ends matter in that they make reliable connection. The performance of difference between connectors, at least up into the very high RF frequencies, isn't meaningful. Even TVs use crappy 'F' connectors without signal degradation.
For speakers, zip (lamp) cord works extremely well. AWG16 or better should be used for more than a couple of feet, but as you note, it's cheap. Termination is a matter of convenience, not signal integrity.
"Oxygen-free" is a scam. "Monster" anything is a scam. Buying cables from BustBuy is a scam. The only thing they make more money on than extended warranties is cables. $75 for a $3 cable isn't bad work, if you can get it.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

In this world there are full of scammers and scammed. They support each other. On RF at extreme low level signal like -100db or below range cable quality and connections matter and skin effect comes into play but on audio range? Cable TV signal is way TOO strong in most cases.
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Certainly. A small amount of education would put them out of business.

-100db what? Decibels is a relative scale. Connectors don't matter until the frequency gets very high indeed. Skin effect of cables (not connectors) can matter, but not at audio frequencies in speaker cables.

Irrelevant and not true at all, by my experience.
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On Sat, 22 May 2010 15:04:44 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Cable techs install more attenuators to solve picture quality issues than amps. Overdriving the tuner IS a real issue
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On Mon, 24 May 2010 19:46:30 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, duh! That's the way the system is designed (pads are a *lot* cheaper than amplifiers and once the signal is in the mud no amplifier can help it).
Once the system is installed the signal continually degrades as components age.
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On Mon, 24 May 2010 19:55:00 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Well, was the last guy not correct saying the signal was too strong in most cases, and the guy saying irrellevent and not true wrong?
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On Mon, 24 May 2010 22:06:36 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, he is not correct. Most installations are decaying. Signals don't get stronger.

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On Mon, 24 May 2010 22:32:19 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"
You say:
"Well, duh! That's the way the system is designed (pads are a *lot* cheaper than amplifiers and once the signal is in the mud no amplifier can help it",
and yet you say we are wrong saying too strong a signal is more common than too weak
Methinks you just want to be argumentative
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On Tue, 25 May 2010 21:35:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'll try to go more slowly for you this time...
Theoretically the system once worked. As the system ages the signal level *drops* as cables and whatnot become lossy.

Meknows you can't read, or think.
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On Tue, 25 May 2010 23:17:21 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

No, if the cable company repairs the lines outside or replaces part of their "plant" the signal can become too strong. The itty bit of cable inside the average residence is insignificant in the grand scheme of things. Then too, if you go to digital cable they replace ALL the cable inside with 100% sheilded cable too. I've personally had it happen several times. Have the attenuators to prove it. First time was with the standard cable in my own home. Second and third times at office. Last time with the new sheilded cable at home.
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On May 24, 7:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've never had a problem with a cable signal being too strong. Just the opposite. In the last 3 homes that I've lived in the signal was too weak once it was split inside the home to multiple TVs (3 or more).
Amps installed every time.
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