broken piston rod

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On 07/12/2016 03:01 PM, James Wilkinson wrote:

A horse would starve on one of the 5 acre McMansions around here without supplemental feed.
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wrote:

100 acres. 95 under cultivation (plus another 100 acres a few miles away), 2 barns, a driving shed and house in the other 5 acres, plus the "lane" or "driveway" - with manicured lawnsaround the building, and beside the lane out to the road.. Used to run 40+ dairy cattle plus another20+ young cattle but the folks have retired from farming. Their daughter and her husband are leaving the military and moving "home" to take over the farm, so there will be about 1300 square feet less grass when the"garden suite" (second home) is planted for the old folks. Lots of very beautifull flower gardens, trees and shrubs as well (they are very active in the local horticultural society)
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Snob :-P
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A friend will help you move house, a good friend will help you move a body.

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Funny, horse handbooks say 1 acre minimum grazing per horse.
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Confucius say: "If you park, don't drink, accidents cause people."

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On 07/13/2016 02:46 PM, James Wilkinson wrote:

A 2 year old is equivalent to 1 AUM, a mature horse 1.25. Depending on the soil type, on a normal year around here you might get .25 AUM/acre for native range, a little more for irrigated land. Of course, you would want to divide your land into rotational plots to assure a feed supply throughout the growing season but you're not going to be making hay from any of them. During the winter months you'll need to feed out about 25 pounds of hay per day, more when the temperatures head towards 0F. Say 4 months or 120 days, you'll be feeding a ton and a half of hay that you'll have to buy. Good years you might pay $100/ton. bad years it might be twice that.
Of course on 5 acres you'll also be in the waste management business. That 25 pounds of forage turns into 25 pounds of horseshit which will turn your pasture sour if you just leave it lie.
The driest parts of the UK get about twice as much rain as we get on a good year. Irrigate heavily, choose grass species to plant wisely, have good soil, and the 5 acre horse may not be too boney.
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There's no such thing as a dry part of the UK. And haven't you invented irrigation?
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On 07/14/2016 06:58 PM, James Wilkinson wrote:

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/rain/how-much-does-it-rain-in-the-uk
Drier... 600 mm is still roughly twice what we can expect. Yes, we've discovered irrigation, assuming you actually have water to irrigate with. A river flows through the valley and there is an extensive network of irrigation ditches. Get up on the benches a couple of hundred feet above the valley and water isn't that easy to come by. Even on the flat land a lot of the McMansion lots that were subdivided from old ranches do not come with water rights.
And, no, I'm not going to get into water laws in the western US. Suffice it to say where water is a scarce commodity without a well defined legal structure in the good old days you'd just go kill the bastard who dammed the creek flowing through your property.
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On 7/10/16 11:07 PM, Deodiaus wrote:

I'm not trying to hurt your feeling here but if your level of mechanical knowledge requires you to ask if a car engine and a lawnmower engine might use the same size piston rod, that repair is probably above your pay grade. Take it to the shop, dude ;-)
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I was thinking if he can, so can I.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_4Y9j93UDY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
ycms8wVC4
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On Monday, July 11, 2016 at 10:01:20 PM UTC-5, Deodiaus wrote:

Should I propane weld Al crankcase cover from the inside ?
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 21:24:30 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

You ARE out of your depth. TOTALLY. Even to aluminum braze that block takes more than you have - both heat and expertise.
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see http://memphis.craigslist.org/grd/5678750036.html I was thinking of building a backcast out of plaster on the outside or just sand to keep it from melting away in case I get too hot. Then just heat it up from the inside to reseal the hole.
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On 7/12/2016 1:09 AM, Deodiaus wrote:

Sure, go for it. Be sure to report back with the results.
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backing MIGHT work if you use refractory sand and keep it DRY,(use binder, but not water!) Tou will need a LOT of BTIs because the whole crankcase will act as a heat sink - sucking away all the heat you can give it. Even to Tif weld it I'd heat the whole thing with a big propane weed-burner or rose-bud tip torch before attempting to weld it or you really need to "pour the coals to it" with the TIG.
Using aluminum "brazing" rods you really need to heat the whole case pretty good too.
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wrote:

If you're serious about this, you're wasting your time. Once you blow a rod on a small engine, that engine is trash. Either buy a new engine, or a short block and replace the top parts yourself. Yes, a professional engine shop might be able to salvage what you have, but it will be very costly and they are not going to repair the block, they will just replace it, probably replace the crankshaft, as well as the piston, rod, and so on. By the time they are done, it will likely cost more than a short block or new engine. That old block is nothing more than scrap metal to be melted down into something new. Send it to a recycle center. You may even get a few bucks for it.
Of course the easiest solution is to send the whole mower to a recycling place and just buy a new lawn mower.....
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2016 23:43:29 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Friend!!! Got it right dead on.
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On 07/13/2016 04:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Every now and then the blind cow finds an acorn. Or something.
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On Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 12:44:32 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Maybe the truck could pick up Danny's fridge on the way?
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On 7/12/2016 12:24 AM, Deodiaus wrote:

Propane weld? Are you using straight propane? Not hot enough.
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:01:16 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

a lot of practice, perhaps. It is NOT a simple job
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