Brick engineering problem

I own a 2 story brick veneer wood frame house. The second story is smaller than the first so some brick walls sit on the roof. If it was a perfect world there would be be strong framing under the brick, the brick would sit on angle iron, and flashing and weepholes would be installed for drainage.
We are repairing some of the second story walls (soffits) because they were done less than perfectly.
Code requires that the angle iron be bolted to the trusses (framing) that the brick is sitting on and not to the wall studs next to them however my engineer says that code is stupid in this case and he feels that the angle iron would hold the brick better if it is attached to the stud wall it is next to. Thinking of getting another engineer's opinion but I figured I would check here for opinions if any engineers are reading.
Thanks!
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BIA Tecdh Notes 17B & 31B speak to Reinforced Brick Lintels and Steel Lintels. A very quick look at the International Residential Code didn't turn up any direct comments on your situation.
The majority of the veneer is tied to the stud wall. I should think supporting it on another system would subject the veneer to differential movement.
Tom Baker
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I was under the opinion that the cardinal rule for any masonry is that it should NOT be supported by wood in any manner, masonry should always be supported by other masonry, concrete or steel. This is physically supported or held up, not tied in laterally as in brick veneer.

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Blueprint calls for triple trusses or double trusses with rafters added in between.

is
it was

brick, the

be
because they

(framing)
them
feels
attached to

engineer's
engineers
Steel
turn up

think
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That's my impression too.
TB
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Engineer says supporting by steel on 2nd story is bad idea because steel softens quickly during fire compared to time it would take for heavy framing to burn.

that it

always be

supported
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He's correct, but steel can be shielded adequately by covering all surfaces with sufficient masonry.
Supporting masonry with wood is a bad idea.
Boden
Art Begun wrote:

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Yes I check BIA site. Should have mentioned it. The tieing of brick to the wall with brick ties is normally just to distribute wind force on the wall and not to hold it up.

is
was
the
they
(framing)
them
feels
to
engineer's
engineers
Steel
up
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Yes, I know the ties don't support the brick. My point was that the brick would be connected to two wood systems that move differntly from each other.
TB

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